Sun Ra is (a Girl Power Academy) featured Jazz Musician

image of Sun Ra

Sun Ra was a highly productive jazz musician, composer, poet and bandleader best known for his “cosmic” philosophies on life and music, and for leading his musical ensemble, the Arkestra.

Famed jazz musician, composer, poet and bandleader Sun Ra was born on May 22, 1914, in Birmingham, Alabama. He began performing professionally as a teen and, after moving to Chicago in 1945, immersed himself in jazz and the blues. Along the way, Sun Ra was influenced by space, religion and radical social movements—all of which found their way into his music. A prolific composer and record label owner, he took to wearing colorful, outlandish costumes with his band members.

Born Herman Poole Blount on May 22, 1914, in Birmingham, Alabama, Sun Ra had an affinity for the piano at a very young age. Ra, who came from a religious family, began performing with other musicians as a teen. In addition to playing with a wide range of musicians from different genres, he wrote and produced songs. After moving to Chicago in 1945, Ra gained important experience working with a growing number of blues and jazz singers, composers and bandleaders, including Wynonie Harris, Fletcher Henderson and Coleman Hawkins.

Chicago also exposed Ra to an African-American intelligentsia and a hotbed of political activism. These religious, cultural and political influences found their way into his music.

In 1952, Ra officially changed his name to Le Sony’r Ra (he also performed under the names Sonny Lee and Le Sonra) while continuing to compose and work with a wide range of jazz practitioners. He also started a record label, Saturn Records, inspired by his love and respect of astronomy as well as the growing influence of spirituality in his life and music. Also in the ’50s, Ra and his band, widely known as the Arkestra (a riff on “orchestra”) began wearing ornate, outlandish costumes in performance—a further manifestation of Ra’s spiritual and theatrical nature.

Performances often included free expression, drum choirs and dancers, and sometimes even acrobats. In The New York Times’ obituary of Ra, writer Peter Watrous noted that the performer’s “willingness to play almost anywhere, from jazz clubs to Egyptian pyramids, from Lower East Side dives with huge 50-member bands, to Coney Island with John Cage, allied him with early performance artists. His career argues persuasively against limitations.”

Ra’s reputation as an Afro-eccentric charlatan-genius in the tradition of Marcus Garvey or Elijah Muhammad led to him becoming one of the 20th century’s greatest avant-garde musician-composers.

But Ra’s skills as an exceptional pianist and composer, always aligned with the swing jazz and blues traditions, never waivered. He also played the organ, harpsichord, celesta and Moog synthesizer. He remained a great innovator, moving to New York in 1961 and to Philadelphia in 1970, and absorbing the spiritual and creative energies of those cities and distilling them into his music. Ra’s extensive discography of studio and live recordings continues to be a reference point for established and up-and-coming jazz musicians and composers.

Sun Ra died in Birmingham on May 30, 1993.

~this music Biography abut Sun Ra was  provided by: http://www.biography.com/people/sun-ra-39870

The Sun Ra “Nuclear War” (music audio) is being posted here FOR NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES. Special thanks and a shout out to Scott for sharing this last night!!!  

Sun Ra Official Website: http://www.sunraarkestra.com

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International Women’s Day is on March 8 and (a Girl Power Academy) is on Board!

In this April 8, 2010 photograph, STS-131 mission specialists Stephanie Wilson of NASA, Naoko Yamazaki of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger of NASA, and Expedition 23 flight engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson (top left) work at the robotics workstation on the International Space Station, in support of transfer operations using the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to move cargo from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. The STS-131 mission's seven-member crew launched aboard space shuttle Discovery on April 5 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center, joining the six residents of the space station when the shuttle docked on April 7. The merging of the two crews marked the first time four women were in space at the same time. Image Credit: NASA
In this April 8, 2010 photograph, STS-131 mission specialists Stephanie Wilson of NASA, Naoko Yamazaki of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger of NASA, and Expedition 23 flight engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson (top left) work at the robotics workstation on the International Space Station, in support of transfer operations using the station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm to move cargo from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module.
The STS-131 mission’s seven-member crew launched aboard space shuttle Discovery on April 5 from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, joining the six residents of the space station when the shuttle docked on April 7. The merging of the two crews marked the first time four women were in space at the same time.
Image Credit: NASA

https://www.internationalwomensday.com

International Women’s Day resources
Every person – women, men and non-binary people – can play a part in helping drive better outcomes for women. Through meaningful celebration and targeted bold action, we can all be responsive and responsible leaders in creating a more gender inclusive world. The World Economic Forum predicts the gender gap won’t close entirely until 2186. This is too long to wait. So around the world, International Women’s Day provides an important opportunity for ground breaking action that can truly drive greater change for women.

Use International Women’s Day (IWD) on March 8 as an important opportunity to:

celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women because visibility and awareness help drive positive change for women
declare bold actions you’ll take as an individual or organization to help progress the gender agenda because purposeful action can accelerate gender parity across the world

http://www.un.org/en/events/womensday/

2017 Theme: “Women in the Changing World of Work: Planet 50-50 by 2030”

International Women’s Day is a time to reflect on progress made, to call for change and to celebrate acts of courage and determination by ordinary women who have played an extraordinary role in the history of their countries and communities.

The idea of this theme is to consider how to accelerate the 2030 Agenda, building momentum for the effective implementation of the new Sustainable Development Goals, especially goal number 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls; and number 4: Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning. The theme will also focus on new commitments under UN Women’s Step It Up initiative, and other existing commitments on gender equality, women’s empowerment and women’s human rights.

Some key targets of the 2030 Agenda:

By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and Goal-4 effective learning outcomes.
By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and preprimary education so that they are ready for primary education.
End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.
Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation.
Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation.
The world of work is changing, and with significant implications for women. On one hand, we have globalization, technological and digital revolution and the opportunities they bring, and on the other hand, the growing informality of labour, unstable livelihoods and incomes, new fiscal and trade policies and environmental impacts—all of which must be addressed in the context of women’s economic empowerment.

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/celebrating-international-womens-day

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