Gnawa Music of Marrakesh is a (Girl Power Academy) “Happy New Year” featured recommendation:

I was blessed to have sum hand drummers in my early life that exposed me to Gnawa and the music of Marrakesh (the capitol of Morocco). Although Morocco is not known for it’s equal rights for or humane treatment of women, the women are the strongest among them.  Love and Gratitude to D. Goodman, Moona El B. & Bebo.  Happy New Year to One and All!    

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The Gnawa Music of Marrakesh (full album) audio music is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES. Album: Night Spirit Masters. Performed by Mustapha Baqbou, Said Oughassal, Brahim El Belkani, Abdelqader Oughassal, Said Fafy and company. Recorded by Billy Youdelman in the Medina of Marrakesh, 1990. Song: Mohammed Rasoul Allal. Album: Global Celebration: Dancing with the Gods. Performed by the Halima Chedli Ensemble. Recorded by Randall Barnwell in Dar El Basha, Marrakesh, 1995. Photos by: http://www.felicewillatphotography.com/

Gnawa music (Ar. غْناوة or كْناوة) is a north african repertoire of ancient African spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers.

The word “Gnawa”, plural of “Gnawi”, is taken to be derived from the Hausa-Fulani demonym “Kanawa” for the residents of Kano, the capital of the Hausa-Fulani Emirate.  The Moroccan language often replaces “K” with “G”, which is how the Kanawa, or Hausa people, were called Gnawa in Morocco.

In a Gnawa song, one phrase or a few lines are repeated over and over, so the song may last a long time. In fact, a song may last several hours non-stop. However, what seems to the uninitiated to be one long song is actually a series of chants, to do with describing the various spirits (in Arabic mlouk (sing. melk), so what seems to be a 20-minute piece may be a whole series of pieces – a suite for Sidi Moussa, Sidi Hamou, Sidi Mimoun or the others. But because they are suited for adepts in a state of trance, they go on and on, and have the effect of provoking trance from different angles.

The melodic language of the stringed instrument is closely related to their vocal music and to their speech patterns. It is a language that emphasizes on the tonic and fifth, with quavering pitch-play, especially pitch-flattening, around the third, the fifth, and sometimes the seventh. This is the language of the blues.

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Bishop Briggs, Galen Hooks, and Tim Milgram are a (Girl Power Academy) featured Music, Dance, and Film recommendation:

Bishop Briggs

Performing has been Bishop Briggs‘ passion since she was 4, when her family relocated from London to Tokyo; her father was an entrepreneur whom she secretly believed was an international spy. She was ruling karaoke lounges before she started kindergarten. “It’s a rite of passage that when you [move to] Japan, you go to a karaoke bar the minute you land,” she says.

Piano lessons and a Tokyo children’s gospel choir helped Briggs learn about harmony. She received vocal coaching as a 10th birthday gift after her family moved again, to Hong Kong. Briggs credits their record collection for connecting her to Western music, as well as having the most influence on her sound, particularly acts like Otis Redding and Janis Joplin. “These singers always sounded as if they were on the edge of tears, or rage,” she says.

When Briggs moved to Los Angeles to study vocal performance at the Musicians Institute in Hollywood, she began singing at bars like the now shuttered Room 5 Lounge multiple times a week. Eventually she was discovered at a gig by former Interscope A&R rep George Robertson, who linked her with producers Mark Jackson and Ian Brendon Scott. The bluesy anthem “River” was written at their first session. Briggs sat in her car afterward, listened to the voice memo and began crying, feeling she was finally going to be heard.

(~excerpts by Claire LobenfeldThis article originally appeared in the April 15 Issue of Billboard. )

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The Bishop Briggs “River” (music audio) Galen Hooks (dance choreography) Tim Milgram (film) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Dancers: Galen Hooks, Nicole Kirkland, Porcia Hendrix, Jackie Ramos, Lindsay Taylor, Maya Hassin, Melany Centeno, Stevie Doré

Bonus Groups: https://youtu.be/OLtdj-DGM8o

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For music and brand partnership inquiries: info@tmilly.com Visit us at: http://www.tmilly.com ~ a T.Milly Production ~

Bishop Briggs “River” LYRICS:

Like a river, like a river, sh-
Like a river, like a river, sh-
Like a river, like a river
Shut your mouth and run me like a river

How do we fall in love
Harder than a bullet could hit ya?
How do we fall apart
Faster than a hair pin trigger?

Don’t you say, don’t you say it
Don’t say, don’t you say it
One breath, it’ll just break it
So shut your mouth and run me like a river

Shut your mouth, baby stand and deliver
Holy hands, oh they make me a sinner
Like a river, like a river
Shut your mouth and run me like a river

Choke this love till the veins start to shiver
One last breath till the tears start to wither
Like a river, like a river
Shut your mouth and run me like a river

Tales of an endless heart
Curses is the fool who’s willing
Can’t change the way we are
One kiss away from killing

Don’t you say, don’t you say it
Don’t say, don’t you say it
One breath it’ll just break it
So shut your mouth and run me like a river

Shut your mouth, baby stand and deliver
Holy hands, ooh they make me a sinner
Like a river, like a river
Shut your mouth and run me like a river

Choke this love till the veins start to shiver
One last breath till the tears start to wither
Like a river, like a river
Shut your mouth and run me like a river

Like a river, like a river, (oh oh oh)
Like a river, like a river, (ooh-oh-oh)
Like a river, like a river
Shut your mouth and run me like a river

Hey, oh oh oh
Hey, oh oh oh (like a river)
Hey, oh oh oh
Oh oh oh (like a river)

Like a river

Shut your mouth baby stand and deliver (stand and deliver)(like a river, like a river)
Holy hands, oh they make me a sinner (make me a sinner)(like a river, like a river)
Like a river, like a river (like a river)
Shut your mouth and run me like a river (and run me like a river)

Choke this love till the veins start to shiver (start to shiver)(like a river, like a river)
One last breath till the tears start to wither (oh oh)
Like a river, like a river
Shut your mouth and run me like a river

Written by Ian Brendon Scott, Mark A. Jackson, Sarah Grace Mclaughlin • Copyright © Universal Music Publishing Group, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc

Tiffany is a (Girl Power Academy) Positive Energy Magazine “Meditation” featured recommendation:

Once again, Please enjoy some Positive Energy Magazine meditations as conducted by the gentle and loving voice of Tiffany.  This meditation is great for recognizing and releasing anger. It focuses on self-acceptance and provides guidance for remembering what genius YOU bring. The Girl Power Academy is grateful for and honored to introduce you to the healing inspiration:

The “Be Flexible – 10 Minute Guided POSITIVE ENERGY Boost Meditation by the voice of Tiffany, for Releasing Anger Tension & Blame” Positive Meditation Positive Energy Magazine (audio) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES

Tiffany is a (Girl Power Academy) Positive Energy Magazine “Meditation” featured recommendation:

Once again, Please enjoy some Positive Energy Magazine meditations as conducted by the gentle and loving voice of Tiffany.  This meditation energizes the mind, body, and Ora. The Girl Power Academy is honored to introduce you to the healing inspiration:

The 10 Minute Guided Meditation on Energizing The Mind Body & Ora (Inner Peace and Deep Relaxation Healing) audio conducted by Tiffany for Positive Magazine Meditations is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Definition of Ora:
o·ra
ˈôrə,ˈōrə/
 
  1. plural form of os2.
 
os2
äs/

noun

ANATOMY
plural noun: ora
  1. an opening or entrance to a passage, especially one at either end of the cervix of the uterus.
Origin
mid 18th century: from Latin os ‘mouth.’

The Second Chakra, often referred to as the Pelvic Chakra or the Svadhisthana Chakra is located at the tailbone, about two finger widths above the root chakra.

It is associated with the following:

  • Body Parts: Ovaries, adrenal glands, spleen, uterus, urinary system, prostate gland, uterus, cervix and lower bowel.
*Ora not to be mistaken for “Aura” although this 10 meditation helps brighten that too!  🙂

Vandana Shiva is (a Girl Power Academy) featured Earth Activist recommendation:

(photo) Dr. Vandana Shiva, Earth Activist

Vandana Shiva

(Please enjoy a video from a Special New Years Edition of Immense Possibilities, Oregon Edition) No one is better known around the globe—and, perhaps, more beloved—than Dr. Vandana Shiva for championing sustainable agriculture, whole nourishing food, thriving local economies, and action-based respect for the natural world. We have the pleasure of a relaxed half hour conversation with her. 

For this and more episodes by Immense Possibilities Visit and lend your support: http://www.immensepossibilities.org (Vandana Shiva)

The Immense Possibilities interview with Dr. Vandana Shiva (video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

For articles by Dr. Vandana Shiva visit: http://vandanashiva.com

Dr. Vandana Shiva trained as a Physicist at the University of Punjab, and completed her Ph.D. on the ‘Hidden Variables and Non-locality in Quantum Theory’ from the University of Western Ontario, Canada. She later shifted to inter-disciplinary research in science, technology and environmental policy, which she carried out at the Indian Institute of Science and the Indian Institute of Management in Bangalore, India

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Dr Shiva and Sir Edward Goldsmith at Bija Vidyapeeth

In 1982, she founded an independent institute – the Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology in Dehra Dun – dedicated to high quality and independent research to address the most significant ecological and social issues of our times, working in close partnership with local communities and social movements. In 1991 she founded Navdanya, a national movement to protect the diversity and integrity of living resources – especially native seed – and to promote organic farming and fair trade. For last two decades, Navdanya has worked with local communities and organisations, serving more than 500,000 men and women farmers. Navdanya’s efforts have resulted in the conservation of more than 3000 rice varieties from across India, and the organisation has established 60 seed banks in 16 states across the country. In 2004, Dr. Shiva started Bija Vidyapeeth, an international college for sustainable living in Doon Valley in collaboration with Schumacher College, U.K.

Dr. Shiva combines sharp intellectual enquiry with courageous activism, and her work spans teaching at universities worldwide to working with peasants in rural India. Time Magazine identified Dr. Shiva as an environmental ‘hero’ in 2003, and Asia Week has called her one of the five most powerful communicators in Asia. In November 2010, Forbes Magazine identified Dr. Shiva as one of the Seven Most Powerful Women on the Globe.

Dr Shiva in Nubra Valley, Ladakh, India

Dr Shiva in Nubra Valley, Ladakh, India

Dr. Shiva has contributed in fundamental ways to changing the practice and paradigms of agriculture and food. Her books The Violence of the Green Revolution and Monocultures of the Mindpose essential challenges to the dominant paradigm of non-sustainable, industrial agriculture. Through her books Biopiracy, Stolen Harvestand Water Wars, Dr. Shiva has made visible the social, economic and ecological costs of corporate-led globalisation. Dr. Shiva chairs the Commission on the Future of Food set up by the Region of Tuscany in Italy, she is a Board member of the International Forum on Globalisation (IGF), and a member of the Steering Committee of the Indian People’s Campaign Against the WTO.

Dr. Shiva has made significant contributions to the areas of Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) and biodiversity. Through her leadership and commitments, Dr. Shiva and her team at the Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology successfully challenged the biopiracy of Neem, Basmati and Wheat. Besides her activism, she has also served on expert groups of the government on Biodiversity and IPR legislation.

Dr. Shiva has campaigned internationally on issues surrounding biotechnology and genetic engineering. She has helped movements in Africa, Asia, Latin America, Ireland, Switzerland and Austria with their campaigns against genetic engineering. In 2003, when the US initiated a dispute against the EU to remove the bans and moratoria on genetically modified crops and foods, Dr. Shiva launched a global citizens campaign on GMOs in the WTO.

Dr. Shiva’s contributions to gender issues are nationally and internationally recognised. Her book Staying Alive dramatically shifts popular perceptions of Third World women. She founded the gender unit at the International Centre for Mountain Development (ICIMOD) in Kathmandu, and was a founding Board Member of the Women Environment and Development Organization (WEDO). Dr. Shiva has also initiated Diverse Women for Diversity, an international movement of women working for food and agriculture. The movement was launched formally in Bratislava, Slovakia, in May 1998.

Dr. Shiva is on the National Board of Organic Standards of India. Dr Shiva was appointed to the advisory board of the National Controller General of Accounts from 2013 to 2015. She also works with the state governments of Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Bihar and Uttaranchal for the promotion of organic farming. She has been invited by the Planning Commission to be a member of the expert group on environment, the expert group on nutrition, and the expert group on the voluntary sector.

Internationally, Dr. Shiva serves on Prince Charles’s expert group on Sustainable Agriculture and she is a member of President Zapatero’s Scientific Committee in Spain. Dr. Shiva advises governments worldwide, and is currently working with the Government of Bhutan to make Bhutan 100% organic. She is also working with the Governments of Tuscany and Rome to create a hopeful and livable future for young people in these times of crises.

Biography provided by http://vandanashiva.com

Joan Henry is a (Girl Power Academy) featured Earth Song Carrier recommendation:

Joan Henry, Song Carrier

My folks have told me I have been singing my whole life. From the time I was very small, no matter what I was doing or feeling, I sang it out. That’s what they tell me. I can remember jumping up in a first grade classroom and singing out because I saw my mother out in the hallway, looking in. So no matter if I was happy or sad, whatever I was doing I sang it out. I remember hearing songs in the leaves of the trees, and singing along or singing back to them as I hid with my bow waiting to pounce on unsuspecting people below.

My grandmother recognized me right away, and she said I would be a singer. As a teen I remember elders coming and looking for me, as if they were expecting me. They would say: “that one, the little one with the voice”. It seemed like I never really had friends my own age because I was always hanging out with the adults. Folks would sing songs to me, and then ask me to sing them back to them, and that’s how I learned. To me, I was just hanging out with these elders, and it was awhile before I realized they were teaching me all these songs. We just sang together. When I think about it, that’s the heart of oral tradition, because you can’t communicate pitch, tone, sound, timbre, feeling, intention on flat paper.

Through song they were teaching me moments, experiences, an environment that is spherical, vibrational— not static. They were waking up my original memory, the knowledge in my cells of experiencing Mother Earth all around us, of experiencing my relationship with everything that is alive. And make no mistake: everything is alive…

Where I’ve come to is the place of carrying these songs – all songs, no matter where they come from – in a good way, so that they can be sung whenever they are needed. That’s what Kanogisgi or “Song Carrier” means. It also makes you responsible to wherever a song is from and means you have to be available when that song needs to be sung. A lot of elders put a lot of time and energy into me; I have to honor that. So I’d say that I’ve come to a place now of focusing on moving the songs out into the world, and listening for the ones that  are emerging at this time, in order to bring them forth, eh? –because the Songs thread the people together, to one another and to the Earth. Songs make a living web. (~Joan Henry)

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The Joan Henry “Alligator Dance” (music dance video documentary) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Joan Henry, at her Blue Deer Center Concert, teaches the Alligator Dance to attendees. The Alligator Dance, as Joan explains, teaches the power of relationship, and is an example of native american call-and-response social dancing.

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The Joan Henry “Heart and Mind” (music video documentary) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Ms. Henry is both hahesh’kah (lead drummer) and dekanogisgi (traditional song-carrier), and a Native Women’s Traditional dancer. Encouraged by her elders, she founded acclaimed traditional drum group Mothers of Nations Singers & Dancers (later known as Sky Woman Singers) — the first women’s drum ever invited to the National Native American Veterans Powwow in Washington DC and the first to preside at Indigenous Peoples’ Day Opening Ceremonies for the United Nations — where Ms. Henry has since presented on healing & spirituality among First Nations women and offered opening prayers & song for the International Day of Peace and the World Indigenous Forum. Here she tell a wonderful story about coyote.

Please visit the Girl Power Academy post featuring:

Our Children’s Trust, Environmental Law, and Coyote Songs