Tiffany is a (Girl Power Academy) Positive Energy Magazine “Meditation” featured recommendation:

Once again, Please enjoy some Positive Energy Magazine meditations as conducted by the gentle and loving voice of Tiffany.  This meditation is great for recognizing the need for self-care as a way to become the most successful in all you do.  It focuses on how to make right choices for your body, mind, and spirit and provides guidance for remembering what love YOU bring, as well as it helps filter out and eliminate the “garbage.” The Girl Power Academy is grateful for and honored to introduce you to the healing inspiration:

The “Caring For Yourself” ( 10 Minute Positive Magazine Meditation Audio by Tiffany)  is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

“Back your heart up with all of your being.” ~Tiffany

Advertisements

Mary J. Blige is a (Girl Power Academy) featured Hip Hop Soul Singer and Actress recommendation:

Mary J. Blige shot by Luis Sanchis at Aesthesia Studios in Mar Vista, CA on Thursday, February 1, 2018 exclusively for PEOPLE magazine.
Photographer: Luis Sanchis
Stylist: Stephanie Tricola/Honey Artists
Hair: Tym Wallace/Mastermind MGT
Makeup: D’Andre Michael/U.G.L.Y. Girl Cosmetics
Dress:Tom Ford†
Shoe: Guiseppe Zanotti
Earings Jennifer Fisher
rings: her own

When I went first went into the studio to work on “My Life II” it occurred to me how strong I’ve become since then. And that what has made me strong is not just the joy and great things happening in my life but the trials and difficulties that cause you to want to move out of that uncomfortable place to get to the next stage. With the first “My Life” album, I didn’t have that understanding. I just did not know why I was suffering so bad, why I was hurting” ~ Mary J. Blige.

Learn more about Mary J. Blige here: http://www.maryjblige.com/bio/

The Mary J. Blige “Whole Damn Year” (Music Video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES

“Whole Damn Year” by Mary J. Blige LYRICS: 
Tryna find a way to explain this
Why you can’t touch me tonight?
I can feel you’re getting impatient
But I really can’t let you inside
Bad, how deep the pain is
Or you just couldn’t believe
And yes I’m good on the surface
But I’m a mess, I’m a mess underneath
See winter took most of my heart
And Spring punched right in the stomach
Summer came looking for blood
And by autumn, I was left with nothing
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It took a whole damn year
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It’s been about five years
Gon’ take a long long year for me to trust somebody
Gon’ take long long year
Gon’ take a long long year for me to touch somebody
It’s been about five years
Not tryna do this on purpose
Boy I really wish I could
Don’t act like you never heard this
I know you haven’t misunderstood
Where the others just wouldn’t respect me
Don’t tell me you use well
I thought we were heading for Heaven
But you’re about to take me back to Hell
See winter took most of my heart
And Spring punched right in the stomach
Summer came looking for blood
And by autumn, I was left with nothing
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It took a whole damn year
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It’s been about five years
Gon’ take a long long year for me to trust somebody
Gon’ take long long year
Gon’ take a long long year for me to touch somebody
It’s been about five years
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It took a whole damn year
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It’s been about five years
Gon’ take a long long year for me to trust somebody
Gon’ take long long year
Gon’ take a long long year for me to touch somebody
It’s been about five years
Bad to the liver, bad to the bones
Bad to the liver, bad to the bones
Bad to the liver, bad to the bones
It’s been about five years
Songwriters: Mary J. Blige / Knox Brown / Emeli Sande
Whole Damn Year lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc, Universal Music Publishing Group
***

The Mary J. Blige “No More Drama” (Music Video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Blige helped redefine R&B and began forging a unique niche for herself on the more personal second album, 1994’s My Life. Blige is an artist that uses her gift of song to lift spirits and touch lives while bringing her heart, soul and truth to those who are willing to listen. She is loved for her passionate, chart-topping hits like “Be Without You”, “No More Drama” and “Family Affair” all of which have made her a force in music.

“No More Drama” for Mary J. Blige LYRICS: 
So tired, tired of these drama
No more, no more
I wanna be free
I’m so tired, so tired
Broken heart again
Another lesson learn
Better know your friends
Or else you will get burn
Gotta count on me
Cause I can guarantee
That I’ll be fine
No more pain (no more pain)
No more pain (no more pain)
No drama (no more drama in my life)
Noone’s gonna make me hurt again
What a player fool
Go through ups and downs
Nowhere and all the time
You wouldn’t be around
Or maybe I like the stress
Cause I was young and restless
But there was long ago
I don’t wanna cry no more
No more pain (no more pain)
No more game (no more game messin with my mind)
No drama (no more drama in my life)
Nooone’s gonna make me hurt again
No more tears (no more tears, I’m tired of cryin everynight)
No more fears (no more fears, I really don’t wanna cry)
No drama (no more drama in my life)
I don’t ever wanna hurt again
Wanna speak my mind, wanna speak my mind
Uh, it feel so good
When you let go
Avoid these drama in your life
Now you’re free from all the pain
Free from all the game
Free from all the stress
So bye your happiness
I don’t know
Only god knows where the story is
For me, but I know where the story begins
It’s up to us to choose
Whatever we win or loose
And I choose to win
No more pain (no more pain)
No more game (tired of your playin’ game with my mind)
No drama (no more drama in my life)
No more, no more, no more, no more
No more tears (no more tears, no more cryin every night)
No more fears (no more waking be up in the morning)
No drama, no more in my life
No more drama, no more drama
No more drama, no more drama
No more drama
No more drama
No more drama
No more drama
No more drama
No more drama in my life
So tired, tired of these drama
Songwriters: Perry Botkin / Perry L Botkin / Barry De Vorzon / James Samuel Iii Harris / James Harris Iii / Terry Lewis
No More Drama lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc
Carrie Mae Weems photographs Mari J. Blige (W magazine spread)

Check out Carrie Mae Weems photographs of Mary J. Blige and read the conversation in W Magazine: https://www.wmagazine.com/story/mary-j-blige-mudbound-carrie-mae-weems-photographs-w-magazine-art-issue

Carrie Mae Weems is a (Girl Power Academy) featured Multi-Media Artist recommendation:

Carrie Mae Weems, 2013 MacArthur Fellow

Biography

Contemporary American artist Carrie Mae Weems was born in Portland, Oregon. She earned a BFA from the California Institute of the Arts, an MFA from the University of California, San Diego and continued her studies in the Graduate Program in Folklore at the University of California, Berkeley. Weems presents a history of the depiction of African Americans through adapting or appropriating archival images, restaging famous news photographs, or creating altogether new scenes. Her work has investigated family relationships, cultural identity, sexism, class, political systems, and the consequences of power. Carrie Mae Weems has developed a complex body of art employing photographs, text, fabric, audio, digital images, installation, and video.
Weems’ works are held in collections including the Art Institute of Chicago; the Metropolitan Museum of Art; the Museum of Modern Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. In 2013, she was named a MacArthur Fellow.  
Carrie Mae Weems photo still from Grace Notes: Reflections for Now (ART21 archive)
  • Grace Notes: Reflections for Now was performed live at the Kennedy Center on October 20, 2017.

The Carrie Mae Weems “Grace Notes Reflections for Now” (Art21 video documentary) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Carrie Mae Weems All the Boys (Blocked1) 2016 image courtesy of Jack Shainman Gallery

On 24th Street, Weems created a series of photography, text, and video, titled “All the Boys” (2016), which evolved out of her performance project from earlier this year, Grace Notes: Reflections For Now. The series responds to the recent killings of young black men, women, and children by police officers in the U.S. In All the Boys (Blocked 3), for instance, Weems presents a diptych of a blurred hooded black male behind a red color block, next to a Ferguson Police Department incident report with all identifying information blacked out as if it is classified.

Lining one wall in the gallery is a series of text panels that provide the basic facts—age, name, date of death, race, height, and weight—of 10 unarmed victims of police shootings, including Philando Castile, Tanisha Anderson, and Eric Garner. The “Usual Suspects” all fit one single description, which Weems states as: “Matching the description of the alleged, perpetrator was stopped and/or apprehended, physically engaged, and shot at the scene. Suspect killed. To date, no one has been charged in the matter.”

Tarana Burke and “Growing Up in the #MeToo Movement” is a (Girl Power Academy) featured recommendation

A Black Woman Created the “Me Too” Campaign Against Sexual Assault 10 Years Ago

written by Zara Hill (Ebony Magazine October 2017)

activist Tarana Burke started the Me Too movement in 2007

Tarana Burke said she began “Me Too” as a grassroots movement to aid sexual assault survivors in underprivileged communities “where rape crisis centers and sexual assault workers weren’t going.”

“It wasn’t built to be a viral campaign or a hashtag that is here today and forgotten tomorrow,” Burke told Ebony in a statement on Monday. “It was a catchphrase to be used from survivor to survivor to let folks know that they were not alone and that a movement for radical healing was happening and possible.”

The campaign’s motto is “empowerment through empathy.”

“What’s happening now is powerful and I salute it and the women who have disclosed but the power of using ‘me too’ has always been in the fact that it can be a conversation starter or the whole conversation – but it was us talking to us,” Burke continued.

But despite the campaign being founded by the Harlem native, she hardly received any credit.

Additionally, Black women were left out of the dialogue that spurred the movement.

If it weren’t for actress Rose McGowan’s rape allegation against Weinstein, the conversation around sexual assault may have never made its way to social media. But the problem is, Black women were quickly isolated from the dialogue before we could familiarize ourselves with it. We weren’t excluded for lack of relation to conversation around sexual assault and misogyny’s impact on our livelihoods. Black women regularly experience sexual assault as well and are often coerced into silence.

Rather, the apathy toward the struggles of people of color infiltrated the movement before we could even consider participating.

When Twitter banned McGowan after discussing the rape and the toxic masculinity of men such as Weinstein, Ben Affleck and Jeff Bezos, White feminists were quick to support the actress. But Black women, such as activist Ashley C. Ford, didn’t feel the same urgency to temporarily abandon the social platform–and for good reason.

“Where was the boycott for ESPN sports journalist Jemele Hill when her employer suspended her from her job citing a vague social media policy?” Ford wrote in an essay for Refinery29. “Where was the boycott when actress and comedian Leslie Jones was harassed by trolls to the point of deleting her account for months?”

Ford’s speculations were spot-on. The outrage simply wasn’t there for the Black women who were put in vulnerable positions by rich White men. White women have either have yet to realize or simply choose not to acknowledge there is a common thread between the oppressive powers of the misogyny imposed on McGowan and the White apathy that suppressed Hill’s voice.

Sadly, the Black women who did stick up for McGowan by retiring from Twitter for a day would quickly be disheartened. Over the weekend, the actress made it painfully clear that her personal struggle was simply that: her struggle. She reminded any person of color who sympathized with her that just because they’d be assisting her with her battles didn’t mean she had any intention on understanding theirs.

When McGowan’s Twitter account was reactivated, she quickly offended Black people when she condemned a segment from a Beverly Hills gala in which comedian James Corden made light of the wave of sexual assault allegations against Weinstein. Upon hearing the “jokes,” she remarked that if the word “women” were to be replaced with the “n-word,” the skit would not have been tolerated.

“This is rich famous Hollywood White male privilege in action,” McGowan wrote. “Replace the word, “women” w/ the ‘N’ word. How does it feel?”

Although the tweet was deleted, Twitter user and #OscarsSoWhite creator April Reign took a screenshot of it and posted it to her Twitter account on Saturday.

McGowan had every right to her indignation. But last I checked, “women” has never held the same derogatory connotation of n**ger, so the unequivocal comparison was simply unwarranted–especially given no Black person took part in the insensitive commentary.

Early on in the conversations that spurred “Me Too,” there was a sense it wasn’t for us. But it doesn’t have to continue on that path. On Monday, Milano credited Burke with the movement on Twitter.

“I think that women of color use social media to make our voices heard with or without the amplification of White women,” Burke said. “I also think that many times when White women want our support, they use an umbrella of ‘women supporting women’ and forget that they didn’t lend the same kind of support.”

The #MeToo founder also said, “In this instance, the celebrities who popularized the hashtag didn’t take a moment to see if there was work already being done, but they also were trying to make a larger point,” she said. “I don’t fault them for that part, I don’t think it was intentional but somehow sisters still managed to get diminished or erased in these situations. A slew of people raised their voices so that that didn’t happen.”

To join Burke’s movement to amplify the voices of sexual assault survivors, go to metoo.support.

(~this article was sourced from: http://www.ebony.com/news-views )

***

The “Growing Up in the #MeToo Movement” (Marie Claire Video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

March For Our Lives is a (Girl Power Academy) call for action!

A march across the Brooklyn Bridge June 2014 Mom’s for Gun Control

Join the Student and Families March on Washington!

On March 24, the kids and families of March For Our Lives will take to the streets of Washington DC to demand that their lives and safety become a priority and that we end gun violence and mass shootings in our schools today.

March with us in Washington DC or march in your own community. On March 24, the collective voices of the March For Our Lives movement will be heard. 

Click Here to Join the March and learn more: https://www.marchforourlives.com

Mission Statement

Not one more. We cannot allow one more child to be shot at school. We cannot allow one more teacher to make a choice to jump in front of a firing assault rifle to save the lives of students. We cannot allow one more family to wait for a call or text that never comes. Our schools are unsafe. Our children and teachers are dying. We must make it our top priority to save these lives. 

March For Our Lives is created by, inspired by, and led by students across the country who will no longer risk their lives waiting for someone else to take action to stop the epidemic of mass school shootings that has become all too familiar. In the tragic wake of the seventeen lives brutally cut short in Florida, politicians are telling us that now is not the time to talk about guns.  March For Our Lives believes the time is now. 

On March 24, the kids and families of March For Our Lives will take to the streets of Washington, DC to demand that their lives and safety become a priority. The collective voices of the March For Our Lives movement will be heard. 

School safety is not a political issue. There cannot be two sides to doing everything in our power to ensure the lives and futures of children who are at risk of dying when they should be learning, playing, and growing.  The mission and focus of March For Our Lives is to demand that a comprehensive and effective bill be immediately brought before Congress to address these gun issues.  No special interest group, no political agenda is more critical than timely passage of legislation to effectively address the gun violence issues that are rampant in our country. 

Every kid in this country now goes to school wondering if this day might be their last. We live in fear. 

It doesn’t have to be this way. Change is coming. And it starts now, inspired by and led by the kids who are our hope for the future. Their young voices will be heard. 

Stand with us on March 24. Refuse to allow one more needless death.

MARCH FOR OUR LIVES!

Marjory Stoneman Douglas Highschool student Cameron Kasky speaks at a Rally for Gun Control on February 17 at the Broward County Fedral Courth House (Rhona Wise Getty Images)

On ABC’s This Week on Sunday, Cameron Kasky, one Marjory Stoneman Douglas High student involved in the event, said those who survived the massacre that killed 17 people are determined to “create a new normal where there’s a badge of shame on any politician who’s accepting money from the NRA.” He said students want to get their message across to President Trump, Sen. Marco Rubio, and Gov. Rick Scott “to give them the opportunity to be on the right side of this.”

 

Emma Gonzalez is a (Girl Power Academy) featured Student Gun-Control Activist

Florida Shooting Survivor Emma Gonzalez to Trump: “We Call BS”

 By

Emma Gonzalez, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School who survived Wednesday’s mass shooting, gave a blistering speech at a (sensible gun-control) rally on Saturday about the politicians complicit in the murder of her classmates. It was yet another reminder that the teenagers and children who grew up in the shadow of school shootings (and the 150,000 who survived one) are more practical—and less tolerant of empty rhetoric—than the adults who are supposed to protect them. Gonzalez had no use for crocodile tears from President Trump, who was in Florida on Friday to offer his condolences (and, reportedly, to drop by a Studio 54 theme party at Mar-a-Lago):

If the president wants to come up to me and tell me to my face that it was a terrible tragedy, and how it should never have happened, and maintain telling us how nothing is going to be done about it, I’m going to happily ask him how much money he received from the National Rifle Association. But hey, you want to know something? It doesn’t matter, because I already know: $30 million. … To every politician who is taking donations from the NRA, shame on you!

Gonzalez’s grief and righteous fury electrified the crowd, which broke into chants of “Shame on you.” She was especially incensed at Trump’s attempts to attribute the shooting to mental illness, given that the president specifically acted to make it easier for mentally ill people to purchase guns:

In February of 2017, one year ago, President Trump repealed an Obama-era regulation that would have made it easier to block the sale of firearms to people with certain mental illnesses. … I don’t need to be a psychologist to know that repealing that regulation was a really dumb idea. Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa was the sole sponsor of this bill to stop the FBI from performing background checks on people adjudicated to be mentally ill, and now he’s stating for the record, “Well, it’s a shame that the FBI isn’t doing background checks on these mentally ill people.” Well, duh: You took that opportunity away last year! The people in government who we voted into power are lying to us. And us kids seem to be the only ones who notice and are prepared to call B.S.

Gonzalez then led the crowd in a spirited call and response, running through a pretty comprehensive list of lies and excuses from the gun lobby and their lackeys.

Companies trying to make caricatures of the teenagers nowadays, saying that all we are is self-involved and trend-obsessed, and hushing us into submission when our message doesn’t reach the ears of the nation? We are prepared to call BS!

Politicians who sit in their gilded House and Senate seats funded by the NRA, telling us nothing could have ever been done to prevent this: We call BS!

They say that tougher gun laws do not decrease gun violence: We call BS!

They say a good guy with a gun stops a bad guy with a gun: We call BS!

They say guns are just tools like knives and are as dangerous as cars: We call BS!

They say that no laws could have been able to prevent the hundreds of senseless tragedies that have occurred: We call BS!

That us kids don’t know what we’re talking about, that we’re too young to understand how the government works: We call BS!

It’s easy for adults to use a speech like this as an excuse for complacency: Any version of “the kids will save us” that doesn’t end with “from the gun-loving death cult we tolerated and nurtured for decades and thus bear special responsibility for confronting,” is, well, BS. But it’s heartening to see that the old lies aren’t working.

Ashlee Haze is a (Girl Power Academy) featured Poet recommendation:

Ashlee Haze “For Colored Girls (the Missy Elliot Poem) Button Poetry performance is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

“…When Missy Elliot is Enuf…”

Reference to:  A Laying on of Hands Poem by Ntozake Shange from “for colored girls who have considered suicide when the rainbow is enuf”

https://girlpoweracademy.wordpress.com/2017/02/25/ntozake-shange-is-a-girl-power-academy-featured-poet-recommendation/

Subscribe to Button! New video daily: http://bit.ly/buttonpoetry

***

the Missy Elliot “Pass That Dutch” (Music Video) is being posted here for Music Inspiration and for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Missy Elliot “Pass That Dutch” (with baby girl interlude intro) LYRICS:
[Missy] (Mary)
Ay yo Mary, I need you to vibe with me on this one
Uh, uh, check it
As I grab my pad and pen and talk from within
Oh God, my eyes, water like a preacher who sins
I’m only human but
The world has put me on a platform
Since the day I was born to only wait for my downfall
But like a brick wall I’m too hard to break
Okay I do make mistakes but I’m the realest from the fake
That’s why I’m the hardest to hate
Aaliyah, baby girl, I’ve learned to love those while they’re still awake
Sleep, asleep
And prepare a place for those who are good
In the projects and hood, gifted or misunderstood
I know Lisa, Pac and Biggie and Jay and Pun are still number one
There will be more of us to come (ohh)
I am a leader, a teacher, a guider (ooh)
Like a single parent provider (ooh)
Putting back those hip-hop dividers
Like a priest with a back slider
I’ve sinned but I win
And anyone we’ve lost in life or nine eleven
We’ll be sure to see again (ooh, hoo)[Mary]
What you hear is not a test (ooh)
I’m rocking to the beat (I’m rocking to the beat)
See me and my crew and my friends (and)
We’re gonna try to move your feet (move around, move around)
See I am Mary Blige (yes I am)
And I’d like to say hello (thank you for inviting me)
To the black to the white, the read and the brown
The purple and yellow (everybody)
But first you gotta, but first you gotta
***

Listen up everyone! We have been just informed
That there’s an unknown virus that’s attacking all clubs
Symptoms have been said to be, heaving breathing
Wild dancing, coughing
So when you hear the sound, WHO-DI-WHOOOO!
Run for cover muthafucka.
WOOOOOO! Ahh daddy! Ooooo! Ah! Oh, ooh!
Pass that dutch (ah), pass that dutch (ooh)
Pass that dutch (ah), pass that dutch (ah)
Pass that dutch (ah), pass that dutch (ah)
Pass that dutch (whoo), pass that dutch

Misdemeanor on the flow, pretty boy here I come
Pumps in the bunk make you want to hurt something
I can take your man I don’t have to sex em
Hang em out the window call me Micheal Jackson (hehehee!)
I’m a pain in your rectum, I am that bitch y’all slept on
Heavy hitter, rhyme spitter, call me Re-Run
Hey hey hey, I’m what’s happ’nin
Hypnotic in my drink (that’s right!)
Shake ya ass till it stink (that’s right!)
Mr. Mos’ on the beat (that’s right!)
Put it down for the streets (that’s right!)

Pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Pass that dutch, pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Come on pass the dutch baby! (ahh!)
Shake-shake shake ya stuff ladies!
(WHO-DI-WHOOOOOOOOOOOOO!)
Pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Pop that, pop that, jiggle that fat (ahh!)
Don’t stop, get it till ya clothes get wet

Number one, drums go bump, bump, bump
This beat here will make you hoomp, boomp, jump
If you’s a fat one, put your clothes back on
Before you start putting pot holes in my lawn
Oh my God, show em I’m large
Shove my beat up, attack like my name was Saddam
I am the bomb from New York to Milan
And I can write a song sicker than Jeffrey Dahm’
(Woop woop!) Don’t touch my car alarm
Break in my car you will hear “Viper Armed”
I’ve been a superstar since Daddy Kane was raw
I’m live on stage, c’mon and give me some applause
“Thank you! Oh thank you, you all are so wonderful!”

Pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Pass that dutch, pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Come on pass the dutch baby! (ahh!)
Shake-shake shake ya stuff ladies!
(WHO-DI-WHOOOOOOOOOOOOO!)
Pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Pop that, pop that, jiggle that fat (ahh!)
Don’t stop, get it till ya clothes get wet

Listen up muthafuckas, you have five seconds to catch your breath.
Five, four, three, two, one

Pop that, pop that, make that money
Just keep it going, like the Energizer Bunny
Shake that, shake that, move it all around
Spank that, yank that, dutch back now
Freak him, freak her, whatever ya choice
Didn’t come to judge, I came to get ya moist
Scream, (WHO-DI-WHOOOOOOO!) now my voice is lost
Can I get a ride on the white horse?

Pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Pass that dutch, pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Come on pass the dutch baby! (ahh!)
Shake-shake shake ya stuff ladies!
(WHO-DI-WHOOOOOOOOOOOOO!)
Pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Pass that dutch, pass that dutch
Pop that, pop that, jiggle that fat (ahh!)
Don’t stop, get it till ya clothes get wet

Pop that
Pass the dutch baby!
Jiggle that fat

(Wake Up) exit lyrics:

[Intro: Missy Elliott (& Jay-Z)]
Eh yo Hov, tell em, hip hop betta wake up
(Yeah, turn the muhfuckin music up
Yeah, turn the muhfuckin music up)

[Verse 1: Missy Elliott]
Motherfuckers betta wake up, stop sellin crack to the black
Hope you bought a spare for your flat
Can’t accept me talkin real facts
Down the hill like Jill and Jack, I speak what yah weak mind lacks
Yah heard that
I’m creative to the fullest
What you talkin bout Willis
Cause your talkin never kill it
I hear but don’t feel it
Thou ain’t realest, you just sweet meat in the village
Yeah I’m a Don Diva Don Niva
Y’all not seen her, heater squeezed into a wife beater
Yep I’m a top leader, I got the Martin Luther King fever
I’ma feed ya, watch ya teacher, need to preach ya

It’s time to get serious, black people all areas
Who gon carry us? It ain’t time to bury us
Cause music be our first love, say ‘I Do’ let’s cherish it

[Hook]
If you dont gotta gun (its alright)
If yah makin legal money, (its alright)
If you gotta keep yah clothes on, (its alright)
You ain’t got a cellular phone, (its alright)
And yah wheels dont spin, (its alright)
And you gotta wear them jeans again, (its alright)
Yeah if you tried oh well, (its alright)
MC’s stop the beef lets sell, (its alright)

[Verse 2: Missy Elliott]
Hip-Hop better wake up, the bed to make ups
Some of y’all be faker than a drag on make up
Got issues to take up, before we break up
Like Electra let go, Missy Anita Baker
I love Jacob but jewelry won’t fix my place up
Gotta stay up, studio nights to cake up
Now check my flavor, rich folks is now my neighbors
I got cable, now check out how I made my paper
Hip-Hop don’t stop, be my Lifesaver
Like Kobe and Shaq if they left Lakers
I’m like an elevator DJ on the crossfader
Black people wake up and see your ass later

[Hook]

[Verse 3: Jay-Z]
I need rims that don’t listen and a booming system
First piece of change I see, I’m gon get one
745 no license to drive
I ain’t even got a home, I guess I’ll live in my ride
Fuck it!… (“rewind” – *echoes*)
“I can hear myself, but I can’t feel myself
I’m wanna feel myself like Tweet
745 no license to drive
I ain’t even got a home, I guess I’ll live in my ride
Fuck it, couple karats in the ear won’t hurt
Need a nice chain, laying on this thousand dollar shirt
Evisu Jeans cover the rectum, my kick game just like David Beckham
Anybody in my way, I wet them
I’mma be this way till the cops come catch ’em
Till detectives sketch em
On the sidewalk wit chalk, New York’s infections
Till I got taught a lesson
Couple niggas gone, couple went Corrections, Emory Got 10

Ty got 15, nigga even my kin
Got five years bringin nineteen in
But just think I used to think like them

Now they gotta live through the pictures that I send them in the pen
Hope you don’t start ya life where I end…
WAKE UP! WAKE UP [x15]

[Hook]

“Pass The Dutch” Written by Timothy Mosley, David Jolicoeur, Vincent Mason, Kelvin Mercer, Paul Huston, Thomas Allen, Harold Brown, Morris Dickerson, Gerald Goldstein, Leroy Jordan, Lee Levitin, Charles Miller, Howard Scott, Missy Elliott • Copyright © EMI Music Publishing, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc, Universal Music Publishing Group