Seinabo Sey is a (Girl Power Academy) featured Singer recommendation:

Seinbo Sey (singer/lyricist)

Some days, I think maybe we should try and be a little more conventional, but every time I try, I fail, so I’m learning to not even entertain that thought anymore.”  ~Seinabo Sey

Seinabo Sey was born in Södermalm, Stockholm on 7 October 1990, she is of both Swedish and Gambian (West African) ancestry. She moved to Halmstad, Sweden at the age of eight, and attended Östergårdsskolans music program for musically gifted teenagers.

I guess one thing that makes my music stand out is that it is quite hard to determine what genre it is.” ~Seinabo Sey

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The Seinabo Sey “I Owe You Nothing” (music video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSE.

Seinabo Sey “I Owe You Nothing” LYRICS

I be myself I aint frontin na na nah

I owe you nothing I be myself I aint frontin na na nah

I don’t have to smile for you I don’t have to move for you

I don’t have to dance monkey dance monkey dance for you

See I wont help you understand

I don’t need no helping hand

These aren’t tears this is the ocean

These aren’t fears this is devotion

I owe you nothing I be myself I aint frontin na na nah

I owe you nothing I be myself I aint frontin na na nah

I don’t have to walk for you I don’t have to talk to you

See I’m not on display, never was, never will ever be for you

I wont help you understand I don’t need no helping hand

These aren’t tears this is the ocean

These aren’t fears this is devotion

Why you always have to try me?

Thinking I’m gon follow blindly saying, ‘oh let me down easy, baby let me drown easy’

Music video by Seinabo Sey performing I Owe You Nothing. © 2018 Saraba AB

SUPPORT the ARTIST:

Listen to ‘I Owe You Nothing’ here: https://seinabosey.lnk.to/IOweYouNothing Seinabo Sey’s debut album Pretend, listen here: https://seinabosey.lnk.to/AlbumPretend

Subscribe to Seinabo Sey’s channel: https://seinabosey.lnk.to/VEVOSubscribe Follow Seinabo Sey on socials: https://seinabosey.lnk.to/followme

Video Credits:

Prod company: New Land, Director: Sheila Johansson, Producer: Adam Holmström, DOP: Tim Lorentzen, Focus puller/Cam asst: Jonas Björne, Stylist: Selam Ghirmay Fessahaye, Make-up: Sainabou Secka, Hair: Sainabou Katri Chune, Editor: Alexander Peri, Colorist: Nicke Jakobsson, Sound design: Martin Mighetto, Online: Mikael, Post production Chimney/Talet group Local production: Production manager: Ousman Drammeh, Production manager: Bubacarr Batchilly, Prod. Koordinator: Oumie Sissoho Driver: Modou Jatta Driver: Ousaman Jarju, Management: Nina Nestlander & Jonas Wikström, Sweden Music Management, Thanks to: Daniel Thissel Sofia Misgena Michaela Grip Ljud och Bildmedia XO Mangement

Seinabo Sey in “Remember” (music-video still) 2018

The song [Remember] is very personal as Seinabo recently revealed to Dazed,

I think I actually wrote it to myself. I know I did. One part of me just wants to be remembered, wants people to like my music, and like me. Another part of me is like, ‘You know damn well that you’ve been liked and that doesn’t make you happier, but if you just want to be remembered we can fix that.’ I’m talking to my ego in a sense. I teamed up with Jacob [Banks], and we turned it into more of a love song, but it’s about wanting to be remembered for all of the good things, and hoping that you can walk out of a relationship – whether it be with myself in time, or with a person – feeling a sense of freedom.”

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Lizzo is a (Girl Power Academy) ‘no-genre hip-hop’ recommendation:

Lizzo (hip-hop artist)

Everyone looks to an artist for something more than just the music, and that message of being comfortable in my own skin is number one for me.”

I like that I’m not typical. I like that I’m called ‘no-genre hip-hop.'”

Every time I rap about being a big girl in a small world, it’s doing a couple things: it’s empowering my self-awareness, my body image, and it’s also making the statement that we are all bigger than this; we’re a part of something bigger than this, and we should live in each moment knowing that.” 

I was raised on gospel. I remember hip-hop and rock music were secular, so basically, for my first ten years living in Detroit, I was on gospel. But when I moved to Houston, that’s when I got to open up my musical horizons.”  (~quotes by Lizzo)

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The Lizzo “Fitness” (official Music video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Lizzo “Fitness” LYRICS:

Independent, athletic
I been sweating, doing calisthenics
Booty vicious, mind yo business
I been working, working on my fitness
I’ve been lifting heavy metal
See this ass? Ain’t no rental
Take it down low like just stretching
Pick it back up like I’m flexing
Woo, tryna get it, working on my fitness
Think about how I’m gonna feel when I step up on the catwalk
Think about how I’m gonna feel when I got that ass that don’t stop
That ass that don’t stop, that ass don’t stop
And think about how I’m gonna feel when I take it all off
Independent, athletic
I been sweating, doing calisthenics
Booty vicious, mind yo business
I been working, working on my fitness
I been working, working on my fitness
Ooh, work my body like
Ooh, I know you want it like
Ooh, but I don’t do this for you
Think about how I’m gonna feel when I step up on the catwalk
Think about how I’m gonna feel when I got that ass that don’t stop
That ass that don’t stop, that ass don’t stop
And think about how I’m gonna feel when I take it all off
but I don’t do this for you
Independent, athletic
I been sweating, doing calisthenics
Booty vicious, mind yo business (better mind yo business)
I been working, working on my fitness (I’m working on my fitness)
Independent, athletic
I been sweating, doing calisthenics
Booty vicious, mind yo business
I been working, working on my fitness
Songwriters: Aino Jawo / Bruce Sudano / Caroline Hjelt / Donna Summer / Edward Hokenson / Eric Frederic / Joe London / Joseph Esposito / Melissa Jefferson / Teddy Geiger / Tom Peyton
Fitness lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.

Support the artist! Lizzo – “Fitness” Out Now

Download/Stream: https://Atlantic.lnk.to/FitnessAY

Follow Lizzo: https://www.facebook.com/LizzoMusic/

https://twitter.com/lizzo

https://www.instagram.com/lizzobeeating/ https://soundcloud.com/lizzomusic

http://www.lizzomusic.com/

Find Out more about Lizzo by clicking Here: https://girlpoweracademy.wordpress.com/2017/02/03/lizzo-is-a-girl-power-academy-inspiration-and-music-recommendation/

Raven Taylor is (a Girl Power Academy) featured Poet recommendation

Raven Taylor performs “How To Survive Being A Black Girl” (Button Poetry Video)

About Button:

Button Poetry is committed to developing a coherent and effective system of production, distribution, promotion and fundraising for spoken word and performance poetry.

We seek to showcase the power and diversity of voices in our community. By encouraging and broadcasting the best and brightest performance poets of today, we hope to broaden poetry’s audience, to expand its reach and develop a greater level of cultural appreciation for the art form.
Subscribe to Button! New video daily: http://bit.ly/buttonpoetry

Nia Lewis is (a Girl Power Academy) featured Poet recommendation

Nia Lewis  “To This Black Woman Body, From Me: Part 1″ & “Closed” (Get Lit Classic Slam Video) 2016.  The Classic Slam is the largest youth classic poetry festival in the world.

Help bring Button to you: http://bit.ly/buttonpatreon4

About Get Lit:

The Get Lit Classic Slam is the largest teen poetry competition in Southern California’s history – where high school students from schools throughout Los Angeles County face off to “slam” classic poems by poets like Neruda, Lorca, Hughes, Dickinson, Angelou, etc. in combination with their own spoken word responses.* The Classic Slam occurs every Spring around National Poetry Month for audiences of thousands. Scholarships are awarded to winning teams and bouts are judged by leading writers, actors, and artists.

Learn more about Get Lit: http://getlit.org/getlit/

Follow Button on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/SG5Xm0

About Button:

Button Poetry is committed to developing a coherent and effective system of production, distribution, promotion and fundraising for spoken word and performance poetry.

We seek to showcase the power and diversity of voices in our community. By encouraging and broadcasting the best and brightest performance poets of today, we hope to broaden poetry’s audience, to expand its reach and develop a greater level of cultural appreciation for the art form.”

Renee Cox is (a Girl Power Academy) featured Feminist Artist recommendation

artist/photographer: Renee Cox
artist/photographer: Renee Cox

One of the most controversial African-American artists working today, Renee Cox has used her own body, both nude and clothed to celebrate black womanhood and criticize a society she often views as racist and sexist.

She was born on October 16, 1960, in Colgate, Jamaica, into an upper middle-class family, who later settled in Scarsdale, New York. Cox’s first ambition was to become a filmmaker. “I was always interested in the visual” she said in one interview, “But I had a baby boomer reaction and was into the immediate gratification of photography as opposed to film, which is a more laborious project.”

"It Shall Be Named" by Renee Cox
“It Shall Be Named” by Renee Cox

From the very beginning, her work showed a deep concern for social issues and employed disturbing religious imagery. In It Shall be Named (1994), a black man’s distorted body made up of eleven separate photographs hangs from a cross, as much resembling a lynched man as the crucified Christ.

"Liberation of Lady J and U.B." by Renee Cox
“Liberation of Lady J and U.B.” by Renee Cox

In her first one-woman show at a New York gallery in 1998, Cox made herself the center of attention. Dressed in the colorful garb of a black superhero named Raje, Cox appeared in a series of large, color photographs. In one picture she towered over a cab in Times Square. In another, she broke steel chains before an erupting volcano. In the most pointed picture, entitled The Liberation of UB and Lady J, Cox’s Raje rescued the black stereotyped advertising figures of Uncle Ben and Aunt Jemima from their products, labels. The photograph was featured on the cover of the French newspaper Le Monde.

“These slick, color-laden images, their large format and Cox’s own powerfully beautiful figure heighten the visual impact of the work, making Cox’s politics clear and engaging,” wrote one critic.

"Yo Mama's Pieta" by Renee Cox
“Yo Mama’s Pieta” by Renee Cox

But her next photographic series would be less engaging for some people and create a firestorm of controversy. In the series Flipping the Script, Cox took a number of European religious masterpieces, including Michelangelo’s David and The Pieta, and reinterpreted them with contemporary black figures.

“…Christianity is big in the African-American community, but there are no representations of us,” she said. “I took it upon myself to include people of color in these classic scenarios.”

"Yo Mama's Last Supper" by Renee Cox (at the Brooklyn Museum)
“Yo Mama’s Last Supper” by Renee Cox (at the Brooklyn Museum)

The photograph that created the most controversy when it was shown in a black photography exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum in New York City in 2001 was Yo Mama’s Last Supper. It was a remake of Leonardo Da Vinci’s Last Supper with a nude Cox siting in for Jesus Christ, surrounded by all black disciples, except for Judas who was white. Many Roman Catholics were outraged at the photograph and New York Mayor Rudolph Guiliani called for the forming of a commission to set “decency standards” to keep such works from being shown in any New York museum that received public funds.

Cox responded by stating “I have a right to reinterpret the Last Supper as Leonardo Da Vinci created the Last Supper with people who look like him. The hoopla and the fury are because I’m a black female. It’s about me having nothing to hide.”

Cox continues to push the envelope with her work by using new technologies that the digital medium of photography has to offer. By working from her archives and shooting new subjects, Cox seeks to push the limits of her older work and create new consciousnesses of the body. Cox’s new work aims to “unleash the potential of the ordinary and bring it into a new realm of possibilities”. “It’s about time that we re-imagine our own constitutions.” states Cox. 

For further information and to View more Photography Visit: Renee Cox.org

Feminist Artist Statement by Renee Cox:
My main concern is the deconstruction of stereotypes and the empowerment of women.

I believe that images of women in the media are distorted and women are imprisoned by those unrealistic representations of the female body. This distortion crosses all ethnic lines and devalues all women. I am interested in taking the stereotypical representations of women and turning them upside down, for their empowerment.

That said, the main inspiration for my work comes from my life experiences. I use myself as a conduit for my photographs because I think that working with the self is the most honest representation of being. I am working toward regaining a “self-love,” not a narcissism, for the black female body as articulated by bell hooks in her book Sisters of the Yam. Slavery stripped black men and women of their dignity and identity and that history continues to have an adverse affect on the African American psyche.

The question for me is where am I at now in my life? I was the first pregnant woman in the Whitney Independent Study Program, as result of this I compelled into a new body of work called The Yo-Mama Series (pregnant and proud). From there I created a superhero named Raje, whose mission was to educate all children about African American history.

When I turned 40 the “Catherine Deneuve Syndrome” set in. In France a woman’s sexuality is allowed to mature, whereas in the United States women are only allowed to be sexual beings until age 39 and then are relegated to the background. As a result my series American Family was created. The body of work was a rebellion against all of the pre-ordained roles I am supposed to maintain: dutiful daughter, diminutive wife, and doting mother.

image from "Queen Annie and the Maroons" by Renee Cox
image from “Queen Nanny of the Maroons” by Renee Cox

In 2002 I became more introspective and decided to look toward other female role models. I found a warrior, a liberator of her people, Queen Nanny Of the Maroons. In the 18th Century Nanny of the Maroons was a military expert and symbol of unity and strength to her people. Throughout time, the legend and spirit of Nanny of the Maroons, the only female among Jamaica’s national heroes, continues to inspire those with a desire for independence and the spirit to achieve it. I named my last body of work in her honor.

“The inner voice is your ancestors whispering in your ear.”

Visit: Brooklyn Museum featuring Renee Cox

Lecture Video: Photographer and mixed media artist Renee Cox discusses her provocative and sometimes controversial work during an interview at the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art in Georgia on Oct. 22, 2009. Cox addresses how race, gender, African-American womanhood, feminism, and social issues inspire and impact her work as an artist.

Crystal Valentine and Aaliyah Jihad are (a Girl Power Academy’s) featured Performance Poets

Crystal Valentine and Aaliyah Jihad “To Be Black and Woman and Alive” (2015) performance poetry:

Subscribe to Button! New video daily: http://bit.ly/buttonpoetry

About Button:

Button Poetry is committed to developing a coherent and effective system of production, distribution, promotion and fundraising for spoken word and performance poetry.

We seek to showcase the power and diversity of voices in our community. By encouraging and broadcasting the best and brightest performance poets of today, we hope to broaden poetry’s audience, to expand its reach and develop a greater level of cultural appreciation for the art form.

Lizzo is (a Girl Power Academy) Inspiration and Music Recommendation…

"My Skin" by Lizzo
“My Skin”  photo still from music video of Lizzo

Gorgeous Melissa Jefferson, born April 27, 1988, known by her stage name Lizzo, is an American alternative hip hop artist based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She is a founding member of indie hip hop groups The Chalice, Grrrl Prty, The Clerb, and Absynthe. Her debut album, Lizzobangers, was released in 2013. In 2015, Lizzobangers was proceeded by Big Grrrl Small World, followed with the 2016 major-label EP Coconut Oil.

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Lizzo “The Truth About Self-Acceptance” (What’s Underneath Project) Lizzo’s Interview video was edited by Andrea Cruz

In this What’s Underneath episode, the rapper Lizzo bravely showcases that self-acceptance is about admitting that you (like everybody else) are a continual work in progress. With beautiful honesty, Lizzo openly talks through her struggles with being a bigger girl and coming to terms with her natural hair.  (Read more about why we love Lizzo: http://stylelik.eu/1ojwHb9 )

The Lizzo (Chalice) “W.E.R.K.” (music video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

quote-by-lizzo

The Lizzo “phone” (music video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.