Miss Eaves is a (Girl Power Academy)featured Rapper, Designer, Illustrator, Photographer, Creative, Black Girl Magic recommendation:

Miss Eaves is the feminist sound storm of Brooklyn based multimedia artist Shanthony Exum. Her fierce femcee electro-pop-rap-dance-explosions were born as a phoenix arisen from the hot fire of both a band and romantic break-up, and she has since spread her wings and played music around the world. Miss Eaves’ brazen, patriarchy push-back, it’s my body, take-no-shit lyrics are rabid animals of honesty. “Hand down my pants I flick the bean. My boo ghost but I don’t need him. Five digits gonna make me squirm and scream. This is all on me.” She says in “Hump Day,” which was was featured on Glamour, Huffington Post and Refinery 29. Her 0 fucks attitude landed her an invitation for a European tour with collaborator and friend, Surfing Leons (Belgium) as well as a tour with Wheatus and MC Frontalot. She has also killed the stage at Tomorrowland, TomorrowWorld and Dour and Les Rockomotive.

Not only a beat slayer, Miss Eaves is a paper mache addict and a bad-ass with a glue gun. A true multi-media junkie, she directs and art directs all her videos plus designs her own merchandise. Drawing inspiration from Frida Khalo, Michel Gondry, MIA, Santigold and Sia she is determined to show the world she is about that DIY life. MC Frontalot once told her: “You aren’t crafty…this is too well-made to be just crafty. You are a fabricator.” And trust, she will take you on a rollercoaster through her imagination.

Miss Eaves’ latest, Feminasty, out on August 4, 2017, was a year-long labor of love produced by longtime collaborator KEISHH and recorded during a winter in Montreal, Canada, which is nasty cold. Feminasty plays on term Femi-Nazi and Janet Jackson’s line, “Ms. Jackson if you’re nasty.” It’s funny-as-fuck cutting commentary will melt your brain into a nasty pile of feminism. “All these little fuck boys All these little fuck boys. Dudes on my clit yeah, I’ve had enough boys.” This is how Miss Eaves rolls. (For more about Miss Eaves or to view the original Bio click on: MissEaves )

The Miss Eaves “Hump Day” (music video) produced by KEISHH is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Miss Eaves “Hump Day” LYRICS:

Hand down my pants I flick the bean
My boo ghost but I don’t need him
Five digits gonna make me squirm and scream
This is all on me

All I need, My hand pressed
Move to the rhythm of my slow breaths
I know best. I know better
I’m killing this, a real go-getter so…

I can lean on me…
Or an arm of a love seat…
H-U-M-P-I-N-G
Bump to my own beat

Like to ride. As I slide
My hand over then go inside
I roll deep. As I keep…
The beat up that satisfies me

[Hook]
Take Five
Slip and Slide
All I need to go
Is one hand inside

Hand down my pants I beat the meat
Take some time and know bout me
My game strong, ex dude was weak
No bone: this is my treat

On my feet. In the shower. Wet
Spigot drip drips. I’m on edge
Little kitty purrs and mama pets
Ima pet her every time she begs

Sooo…I’m gonna take my time
Ima go go ‘til I get mine
Rub a dub dub in the tub
My legs up. Don’t give a fuck

Pressing my button. I feel my loving
Pressing button. I feel this rubbing
Engine go go. I’m on the floor
I go go ’til I explode

[Hook]

On the edge I’m ready
Fingers dip dip breathe heavy
On the edge I’m ready
Gonna drip drip bursting levee

Follow Miss Eaves
https://www.instagram.com/yoeaves/
https://www.facebook.com/Misseavesraps/
https://twitter.com/yoeaves

Produced by KEISHH Mixed by Velos,
Video Crew:
Directors: Shanthony Exum (@yoeaves) & April Maxey (@amaxey422)
Producer: Shanthony Exum
Production Company: 422Luxe (http://www.422luxe.com)
Director of Photography: Meg Skaff (@uncle_meg)
Editors: Meg Skaff and April Maxey
Art Director: Mary Lena Colston (@mary_lena_colston)
Makeup: Clara Rae (@Clara_rae)
Nails: Claire Beaudreault (@ManiClaire)
Production Assistant: Nathan Fennell (@nathanf_dolla)

Video Cast Cast (in order of appearance)
Carrie Griffin
Carmen
Sara Katherine
Claire (@ClaraBiznass)
Shaheeda
Quanda
Mary Kate Kruhm
Alexandra Miller
Kirby Cernosek
Chadley
Rossanna Mercedes
Ghazal (@ghazal_rahman)
Karen Sepulveda

#misseaves #rapper #designer #illustrator #photographer #creative #blackgirlmagic

Sevdaliza is a (Girl Power Academy) featured Artist/Musician recommendation…

Sevdaliza (photo still) from the video “Human”

“By the time I was 16, I left home. When you get thrown into a big world like that, it’s not simple — you either survive or you don’t.”

Rotterdam’s Sevdaliza made her debut with The Suspended Kid. In many ways, the EP is about survival, and the unusual shape her life has taken in the last decade. “The title is how people responded to me in social situations,” she says. “I realized that those things that deflect me from social situations — not getting along with your coach or your boss or whatever — it made me realize I had to chose a different path.” For most of her life, her path was very different from the one she’s on now.

Born in Iran before her parents moved the family to the Netherlands, Sevdaliza left home at 16 on a basketball scholarship, eventually playing on the Dutch national team. “My world revolved around surviving,” she says. “When you plays sports on a high level it takes a lot of discipline, and because I wasn’t around my parents, it taught me how to survive.” She went to university, received her masters in communication and started working, but it wasn’t a good fit. “Very early on, I realized that it wasn’t the type life I had imagined for myself.”

“Doing professional sports, you’re forcing yourself to do better and to give more, and that becomes your way of doing things, but it doesn’t necessarily make you happy. You’re like a robot and you don’t know how to not do that,” she explains. “With music, I turned it around. I started following my feelings, and I had never felt something like this.” Not trained to read music or play instruments, she spent hours in the studio teaching herself how to sing and how to use Ableton, drawing on the reserve of discipline that drove her time in sports.

To read the complete interview and watch a selection of Sevadaliza’s videos go to: Fact Mag’s interview with Sevdaliza

The Sevdaliza “Human” (music video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

“Human” Lyrics

Nothing…

I am, I have
I breathe in and out
I own a heart
An ear and an eye
I’ve only been here one time

It’s passing me by
Been in and out
And in front of my judgmental eyes
My precious disguise
Business so cold
Can’t cope with my own
How to not fail

I am flesh, bones
I am skin, soul
I am human
Nothing more than human
I am sweat, flaws
I am veins, scars
I am human
Nothing more than human

I am flesh, bones
I am skin, soul
I am human
Nothing more than human

I am human
I am human

The Brujas of the Bronx are a (Girl Power Academy) Skater-Chick featured recommendation…

Brujas from the Bronx Skaters

The Brujas, a crew of female skateboarders, have gathered regularly there for more than two years, but they still tend to turn heads. Even as they have become fixtures in the local skateboarding community, the young women — all of them from ethnic minorities, most from Upper Manhattan or the Bronx — are frequently greeted with catcalling and rubbernecking.

“Silly boys acting like they’ve never seen a girl before,” scoffed Arianna Gil, 22, who helped found the group in 2014. “Skater bros all think they’re rebels, but who are the real outsiders here?”

Skateboarding, which long enjoyed a freewheeling, anti-establishment reputation, has gained substantial mainstream traction and corporate sponsorship over the years. And still the sport remains dominated by men, most of them white. The Brujas hope their presence on the scene will challenge skateboarding culture with what they view as a more radical agenda.

“There’s so little opportunity for young people of color in terms of jobs and education that we don’t feel like a part of this city,” Ms. Gil said. “Skating is a way to reclaim our freedom.”

The Brujas of the Bronx (video documentary) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

A crew of female skaters called The Brujas are trying to redefine skateboarding culture. Produced by: MANJULA VARGHESE

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/2afLeQK

Brujas is a featured (Girl Power Academy) Music recommendation…

Frasqueri describes herself as having an alter ego collective named “Princess Nokia” In an interview with Bullet Magazine, she explains,

As Princess Nokia I can project the multi-dimensional aspects of myself that I could not express with the name Wavy Spice. I can venture into any realm of music or character of my choosing without confusion. I’m making worldly music—music that will talk to all kinds of people. Banjee girls in Harlem, teen brides in the Middle East, gay boys in East Asia. Labels no longer matter. My new music is cosmic and three-dimensional, and it will really speak of who Princess Nokia is. Princess Nokia is sound. It is progression. It is all that I am.

The Brujas “Princess Nokia” (music video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Directed by Asli Baykal
Co Directed and Concept by Destiny Frasqueri

Production Company: TANK Productions
Line Producer: Ian Lawton King
Assistant Director: Tracy Antonopoulos
Director of Photography: Ben L. Nicholas
1st AC: Ryan Nocella
2nd AC: Govinda Angulo
Production Assistant: Flynn Roddam & Jess Sweat
Sound: Deanna Williams
Editor: Asli Baykal & Adrien Cothier
Additional Editting: Dean Marcial
Colorist: Josh Bohoskey

LYRICS:

I’m your supreme
I’m your supreme

[Verse 1:]
We is them ghetto witches
Speaking in tongue bitches
Fall on the floor
Got sage on the door [x4]

Talk shit, we can cast spells
Long weaves, long nails
Corn rows, pig tails
Baby fathers still in jail

Good witches, I fuck with
Bad bitches, we run shit
4 bitches, 4 corners
North, East, West, South shit

Good witches, I fuck with
Hopped off of my broomstick
Witchcraft, bitch craft
Black magic, it’s nothing

[Chorus:]
Orisha, my alter [x3]
Got coins on the counter

[Verse 2:]
I’m that Black a-Rican bruja straight out from the Yoruba
And my people come from Africa diaspora, Cuba

And you mix that Arawak, that original people
I’m that Black Native American, I vanquish all evil
I’m that Black a-Rican bruja straight out from the Yoruba
And my ancestors Nigerian, my grandmas was brujas

And I come from an island and it’s called Puerto Rico
And it’s one of the smallest but it got the most people

[Chorus:]
Orisha, my alter [x3]
Got coins on the counter
[x2]

Don’t you fuck with my energy [x8]

[Verse 3:]
Casting spells with my cousins
I’m the head of this coven
I’m a shapeshifting bitch, you don’t know who you loving
Better light you a candle
I heard the nighttime was black

And if you don’t watch your step the greatest bitch will be back
I cast a circle in white and I can vanquish your spite
And if you hex me with hate then I’ma conjour the light
Your evil ways put no fight

I ain’t no queen of the night
I’m a bruja, I’m a bruja, and I’ma dress in all white

I’m your supreme [x8]

Valerie June is a (Girl Power Academy) featured and recommended Musician…

Valerie June

The Order Of Time http://valeriejune.com/biography

“Understanding the order of time is important to anyone hoping to manifest a dream,” says Valerie June. “There is a time to push, and a time to gently tend the garden.”

Since the release of her 2013 breakout Pushin’ Against A Stone, June has been patiently at work in the garden of song, nurturing seedlings with love and care into the lush bloom that is her stunning new album, The Order Of Time. Some songs grew from seeds planted more than a decade ago, others blossomed overnight when she least expected them to, but every track bears the influence of time. See, time has been on June’s mind a lot lately. It’s the only constant in life, even though it’s constantly changing. It’s the healer of all wounds, the killer of all men. It’s at once infinite and finite, ever flowing with twists and turns and brutal, churning rapids that give way to serene stretches of placid tranquility. Fight against the current and it will knock you flat on your ass. Learn to read it, to speak its language, and it will carry you exactly where you’re meant to be.

“Time is the ruler of Earth’s rhythm,” June explains. “Our daily lives revolve around it. Our hearts beat along to its song. If we let it, it can be a powerful guide to turning our greatest hopes and dreams into realities.”

June knows a thing or two about turning hopes and dreams into realities. With Pushin’ Against A Stone, she went from self-releasing her music as Tennessee’s best kept secret to being hailed by the New York Times as one of America’s “most intriguing, fully formed new talents.”  The New Yorker was captivated by her “unique, stunning voice,” while Rolling Stone dubbed her “unstoppable,” and NPR called her “an elemental talent born with the ability to rearrange the clouds themselves.” She astonished TV audiences from coast-to-coast with spellbinding performances on The Tonight ShowThe Late ShowAustin City LimitsRachael Ray, and CBS Saturday Morning, and graced some of the world’s most prestigious stages, from Carnegie Hall to the Kennedy Center. First Lady Michelle Obama invited June to The White House, and she toured with artists like Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings, Sturgill Simpson, Norah Jones, and Jake Bugg in addition to flooring festival crowds at Bonnaroo, Outside Lands, Newport Folk, Hangout, ACL, Pickathon, Mountain Jam and more. In the UK, the reaction was similarly ecstatic. June performed on Later…with Jools Holland, joined a bill with the Rolling Stones in Hyde Park, and took the press by storm. Uncut praised her “remarkably careworn vocals,” MOJO swooned for her “glorious sound,” and The Independent’s Andy Gill wrote, “June has the most strikingly individual delivery I’ve heard in ages.”

When it came time to record the follow-up, June felt liberated by the success, fearless and more confident than ever in trusting her instincts and following her muse. There was to be no rushing the music, no harvesting a song before it was ripe on the vine and ready to be plucked. When she sensed the time was right, she headed to rural Guilford, Vermont, with producer Matt Marinelli, spending long stretches through the fall and winter living and recording away from the hustle and bustle of her adopted home of Brooklyn.

“They made us feel so welcome in Vermont,” remembers June. “I was cooking amazing food and hanging out with the band all the time. There were long talks and long walks in the snow, and friends would come up for holidays. I felt like I put myself in a place where I could really soar. With the last album, I was absorbing and learning and developing so much in the studio, but this is me taking the things I learned and the things I felt in my heart and fighting for them.”

In her heart, June is a songwriter first and foremost, willing and able to blur the lines between genres and eras of sounds. The result is an eclectic blend of folk and soul and country and R&B and blues that is undoubtedly the finest work of her career. Opener “Long Lonely Road” settles in like languid southern heat, as June looks back to the sacrifices of her parents and grandparents, singing in a gentle near-whisper of the sometimes difficult, sometimes beautiful journey we all must undertake in search of brighter days. On the soulful “Love You Once Made,” her voice is backed by rich horns and vintage organ as she makes peace with the specter of loss and the ephemeral nature of our relationships, while the bluesy juke joint rocker “Shake Down” features backup vocals from her brothers, Jason and Patrick Hockett and father, Emerson Hockett recorded at home in Tennessee, and “Man Done Wrong” centers on a hypnotic banjo riff that’s more African than Appalachian.

“People shouldn’t necessarily think of bluegrass when they see the banjo,” explains June. “It was originally an African instrument, and people in America used to play all kinds of banjo: mandolin banjo, ukulele banjo, bass banjo, classical banjo, jazz banjo, there were even banjo orchestras. For some reason people like to limit it and say it just has to be in folk and bluegrass, but to me it can be in anything, and I really wanted to set the banjo free on this record.”

The banjo turns up again later as the underpinning of the R&B rave-up “Got Soul,” which plays out like a mission statement for the entire album, as June offers to “sing a country tune” or “play the blues” but reveals that underneath it all is her sweet soul. Those genre terms might be simplistic ways to attempt to define her, empty signifiers creating distinctions between sounds where June sees none. “With You” channels the sprightly, ethereal beauty of Nico with fingerpicked electric guitar and cinematic strings, “Slip Slide On By” grooves with shades of Van Morrison, and “If And” slowly builds over meditative hum that hints at John Cale.

Despite the music’s varied nature, the songs all belong to a cohesive family, in part because they’re tied together by June’s one-of-a-kind voice, and because they’re all pieces of a larger rumination on the passage of time and how it affects us. The ultimate takeaway from tracks like “The Front Door” and “Just In Time” is that the present is all we have. Everything around us (our loved ones, our youth, our beauty) will someday fade and disappear, but that transience is what makes those things all the more magical. We’re given this brief moment to share our love and light with the world, and when, as June sings on the album, “Time’s hands turn and point straight towards you,” you’d better be ready.

Thankfully for us, June was ready when time told her to harvest these songs. In the garden, as in life, there is a time for everything and the moment has finally arrived to enjoy the fruits of all her labor. With ‘The Order Of Time,’ Valerie June has prepared a bountiful feast, and there’s a seat at the table for everyone.

Valerie June featured on the PBS Newshour

Singer-songwriter Valerie June says inspiration comes to her in all forms, at all times of the day. The Memphis, Tennessee, native reflects on her unique voice. (April 2017)

The Valerie June “Sings and Athem For the Workin’ Woman” is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES. 

The Valerie June “Shakedown” (music video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

The Valerie June “You Can’t Be Told” (music Video) is being posted her for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

International Women’s Day is on March 8 and (a Girl Power Academy) is on Board!

In this April 8, 2010 photograph, STS-131 mission specialists Stephanie Wilson of NASA, Naoko Yamazaki of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger of NASA, and Expedition 23 flight engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson (top left) work at the robotics workstation on the International Space Station, in support of transfer operations using the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to move cargo from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. The STS-131 mission's seven-member crew launched aboard space shuttle Discovery on April 5 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center, joining the six residents of the space station when the shuttle docked on April 7. The merging of the two crews marked the first time four women were in space at the same time. Image Credit: NASA
In this April 8, 2010 photograph, STS-131 mission specialists Stephanie Wilson of NASA, Naoko Yamazaki of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger of NASA, and Expedition 23 flight engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson (top left) work at the robotics workstation on the International Space Station, in support of transfer operations using the station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm to move cargo from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module.
The STS-131 mission’s seven-member crew launched aboard space shuttle Discovery on April 5 from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, joining the six residents of the space station when the shuttle docked on April 7. The merging of the two crews marked the first time four women were in space at the same time.
Image Credit: NASA

https://www.internationalwomensday.com

International Women’s Day resources
Every person – women, men and non-binary people – can play a part in helping drive better outcomes for women. Through meaningful celebration and targeted bold action, we can all be responsive and responsible leaders in creating a more gender inclusive world. The World Economic Forum predicts the gender gap won’t close entirely until 2186. This is too long to wait. So around the world, International Women’s Day provides an important opportunity for ground breaking action that can truly drive greater change for women.

Use International Women’s Day (IWD) on March 8 as an important opportunity to:

celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women because visibility and awareness help drive positive change for women
declare bold actions you’ll take as an individual or organization to help progress the gender agenda because purposeful action can accelerate gender parity across the world

http://www.un.org/en/events/womensday/

2017 Theme: “Women in the Changing World of Work: Planet 50-50 by 2030”

International Women’s Day is a time to reflect on progress made, to call for change and to celebrate acts of courage and determination by ordinary women who have played an extraordinary role in the history of their countries and communities.

The idea of this theme is to consider how to accelerate the 2030 Agenda, building momentum for the effective implementation of the new Sustainable Development Goals, especially goal number 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls; and number 4: Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning. The theme will also focus on new commitments under UN Women’s Step It Up initiative, and other existing commitments on gender equality, women’s empowerment and women’s human rights.

Some key targets of the 2030 Agenda:

By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and Goal-4 effective learning outcomes.
By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and preprimary education so that they are ready for primary education.
End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.
Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation.
Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation.
The world of work is changing, and with significant implications for women. On one hand, we have globalization, technological and digital revolution and the opportunities they bring, and on the other hand, the growing informality of labour, unstable livelihoods and incomes, new fiscal and trade policies and environmental impacts—all of which must be addressed in the context of women’s economic empowerment.

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/celebrating-international-womens-day

Amina Mama quote

Erykah Badu is (a Girl Power Academy) featured Hip Hop Artist recommendation

The Erykah Badu “Love Of My Life” (An Ode To Hip Hop) ft. Common (Music Video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.
Music video by Erykah Badu performing Love Of My Life (An Ode To Hip Hop). (C) 2002 Geffen Records spent four weeks at number one on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks chart, and reached number 9 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song also won a Soul Train Lady of Soul Award for Best Solo R&B/Soul Single. It additionally won a Grammy for best R&B song in 2003.
The song won the Grammy Award for Best R&B Songon the 2003 award ceremony, and was nominated for Best Urban/Alternative Performance and Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media.

Erykah Badu video still from Love Of My Life (An Ode To Hip Hop)
Erykah Badu video still from Love Of My Life (An Ode To Hip Hop)

American singer-songwriter, record producer, disc jockey, activist, and actress Erykah Badu grew up listening to ’70s soul and ’80s hip-hop, but drew more comparisons to Billie Holiday upon her breakout in 1997, after the release of her first album, Baduizm.

“I’m a touring artist, not a recording artist,” she says, and she remains a big draw throughout the world. Her concerts and other appearances, combined with her garrulous presence on social media, have helped to solidify her position as one of the country’s most revered singers: a nineties star whose early hits have aged well and whose later work is both warmer and bolder than the songs that made her famous. She has also become a touchstone for a generation of younger musicians—the cool big sister they always wanted, as well as a self-empowered sex symbol. (“My ass and legs have gotten thick,” she once sang. “Yeah, it’s all me.”)”

~for source of quotes and full article go to: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/04/25/erykah-badu-the-godmother-of-soul

erykah-badu-1More often, though, Badu’s love life has inspired curiosity, along with jokes about her supposedly mystical power over men. During an interview on BET, she acknowledged the chatter: “There’s an urban legend that says, If you get involved with Erykah Badu, you’ll change gods, wear crocheted pants, and all this other stuff.” (“Crocheted pants” was a reference to the rapper Common, whose music and outfits grew notably more outré when he dated Badu, in the early aughts. He has admitted that she did buy him a pair of knitted trousers, but insists that the ill-fated decision to wear them for a photo shoot was his alone.) Badu once wrote a song called “Fall in Love (Your Funeral),” in which she uses the rumors to create a negative-psychology pickup line. “See, you don’t wanna fall in love with me,” she coos, while sending precisely the opposite message: of course you do.