Mary J. Blige is a (Girl Power Academy) featured Hip Hop Soul Singer and Actress recommendation:

Mary J. Blige shot by Luis Sanchis at Aesthesia Studios in Mar Vista, CA on Thursday, February 1, 2018 exclusively for PEOPLE magazine.
Photographer: Luis Sanchis
Stylist: Stephanie Tricola/Honey Artists
Hair: Tym Wallace/Mastermind MGT
Makeup: D’Andre Michael/U.G.L.Y. Girl Cosmetics
Dress:Tom Ford†
Shoe: Guiseppe Zanotti
Earings Jennifer Fisher
rings: her own

When I went first went into the studio to work on “My Life II” it occurred to me how strong I’ve become since then. And that what has made me strong is not just the joy and great things happening in my life but the trials and difficulties that cause you to want to move out of that uncomfortable place to get to the next stage. With the first “My Life” album, I didn’t have that understanding. I just did not know why I was suffering so bad, why I was hurting” ~ Mary J. Blige.

Learn more about Mary J. Blige here: http://www.maryjblige.com/bio/

The Mary J. Blige “Whole Damn Year” (Music Video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES

“Whole Damn Year” by Mary J. Blige LYRICS: 
Tryna find a way to explain this
Why you can’t touch me tonight?
I can feel you’re getting impatient
But I really can’t let you inside
Bad, how deep the pain is
Or you just couldn’t believe
And yes I’m good on the surface
But I’m a mess, I’m a mess underneath
See winter took most of my heart
And Spring punched right in the stomach
Summer came looking for blood
And by autumn, I was left with nothing
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It took a whole damn year
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It’s been about five years
Gon’ take a long long year for me to trust somebody
Gon’ take long long year
Gon’ take a long long year for me to touch somebody
It’s been about five years
Not tryna do this on purpose
Boy I really wish I could
Don’t act like you never heard this
I know you haven’t misunderstood
Where the others just wouldn’t respect me
Don’t tell me you use well
I thought we were heading for Heaven
But you’re about to take me back to Hell
See winter took most of my heart
And Spring punched right in the stomach
Summer came looking for blood
And by autumn, I was left with nothing
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It took a whole damn year
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It’s been about five years
Gon’ take a long long year for me to trust somebody
Gon’ take long long year
Gon’ take a long long year for me to touch somebody
It’s been about five years
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It took a whole damn year
It took a whole damn year to repair my body
It’s been about five years
Gon’ take a long long year for me to trust somebody
Gon’ take long long year
Gon’ take a long long year for me to touch somebody
It’s been about five years
Bad to the liver, bad to the bones
Bad to the liver, bad to the bones
Bad to the liver, bad to the bones
It’s been about five years
Songwriters: Mary J. Blige / Knox Brown / Emeli Sande
Whole Damn Year lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc, Universal Music Publishing Group
***

The Mary J. Blige “No More Drama” (Music Video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Blige helped redefine R&B and began forging a unique niche for herself on the more personal second album, 1994’s My Life. Blige is an artist that uses her gift of song to lift spirits and touch lives while bringing her heart, soul and truth to those who are willing to listen. She is loved for her passionate, chart-topping hits like “Be Without You”, “No More Drama” and “Family Affair” all of which have made her a force in music.

“No More Drama” for Mary J. Blige LYRICS: 
So tired, tired of these drama
No more, no more
I wanna be free
I’m so tired, so tired
Broken heart again
Another lesson learn
Better know your friends
Or else you will get burn
Gotta count on me
Cause I can guarantee
That I’ll be fine
No more pain (no more pain)
No more pain (no more pain)
No drama (no more drama in my life)
Noone’s gonna make me hurt again
What a player fool
Go through ups and downs
Nowhere and all the time
You wouldn’t be around
Or maybe I like the stress
Cause I was young and restless
But there was long ago
I don’t wanna cry no more
No more pain (no more pain)
No more game (no more game messin with my mind)
No drama (no more drama in my life)
Nooone’s gonna make me hurt again
No more tears (no more tears, I’m tired of cryin everynight)
No more fears (no more fears, I really don’t wanna cry)
No drama (no more drama in my life)
I don’t ever wanna hurt again
Wanna speak my mind, wanna speak my mind
Uh, it feel so good
When you let go
Avoid these drama in your life
Now you’re free from all the pain
Free from all the game
Free from all the stress
So bye your happiness
I don’t know
Only god knows where the story is
For me, but I know where the story begins
It’s up to us to choose
Whatever we win or loose
And I choose to win
No more pain (no more pain)
No more game (tired of your playin’ game with my mind)
No drama (no more drama in my life)
No more, no more, no more, no more
No more tears (no more tears, no more cryin every night)
No more fears (no more waking be up in the morning)
No drama, no more in my life
No more drama, no more drama
No more drama, no more drama
No more drama
No more drama
No more drama
No more drama
No more drama
No more drama in my life
So tired, tired of these drama
Songwriters: Perry Botkin / Perry L Botkin / Barry De Vorzon / James Samuel Iii Harris / James Harris Iii / Terry Lewis
No More Drama lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc
Carrie Mae Weems photographs Mari J. Blige (W magazine spread)

Check out Carrie Mae Weems photographs of Mary J. Blige and read the conversation in W Magazine: https://www.wmagazine.com/story/mary-j-blige-mudbound-carrie-mae-weems-photographs-w-magazine-art-issue

Advertisements

Tarana Burke and “Growing Up in the #MeToo Movement” is a (Girl Power Academy) featured recommendation

A Black Woman Created the “Me Too” Campaign Against Sexual Assault 10 Years Ago

written by Zara Hill (Ebony Magazine October 2017)

activist Tarana Burke started the Me Too movement in 2007

Tarana Burke said she began “Me Too” as a grassroots movement to aid sexual assault survivors in underprivileged communities “where rape crisis centers and sexual assault workers weren’t going.”

“It wasn’t built to be a viral campaign or a hashtag that is here today and forgotten tomorrow,” Burke told Ebony in a statement on Monday. “It was a catchphrase to be used from survivor to survivor to let folks know that they were not alone and that a movement for radical healing was happening and possible.”

The campaign’s motto is “empowerment through empathy.”

“What’s happening now is powerful and I salute it and the women who have disclosed but the power of using ‘me too’ has always been in the fact that it can be a conversation starter or the whole conversation – but it was us talking to us,” Burke continued.

But despite the campaign being founded by the Harlem native, she hardly received any credit.

Additionally, Black women were left out of the dialogue that spurred the movement.

If it weren’t for actress Rose McGowan’s rape allegation against Weinstein, the conversation around sexual assault may have never made its way to social media. But the problem is, Black women were quickly isolated from the dialogue before we could familiarize ourselves with it. We weren’t excluded for lack of relation to conversation around sexual assault and misogyny’s impact on our livelihoods. Black women regularly experience sexual assault as well and are often coerced into silence.

Rather, the apathy toward the struggles of people of color infiltrated the movement before we could even consider participating.

When Twitter banned McGowan after discussing the rape and the toxic masculinity of men such as Weinstein, Ben Affleck and Jeff Bezos, White feminists were quick to support the actress. But Black women, such as activist Ashley C. Ford, didn’t feel the same urgency to temporarily abandon the social platform–and for good reason.

“Where was the boycott for ESPN sports journalist Jemele Hill when her employer suspended her from her job citing a vague social media policy?” Ford wrote in an essay for Refinery29. “Where was the boycott when actress and comedian Leslie Jones was harassed by trolls to the point of deleting her account for months?”

Ford’s speculations were spot-on. The outrage simply wasn’t there for the Black women who were put in vulnerable positions by rich White men. White women have either have yet to realize or simply choose not to acknowledge there is a common thread between the oppressive powers of the misogyny imposed on McGowan and the White apathy that suppressed Hill’s voice.

Sadly, the Black women who did stick up for McGowan by retiring from Twitter for a day would quickly be disheartened. Over the weekend, the actress made it painfully clear that her personal struggle was simply that: her struggle. She reminded any person of color who sympathized with her that just because they’d be assisting her with her battles didn’t mean she had any intention on understanding theirs.

When McGowan’s Twitter account was reactivated, she quickly offended Black people when she condemned a segment from a Beverly Hills gala in which comedian James Corden made light of the wave of sexual assault allegations against Weinstein. Upon hearing the “jokes,” she remarked that if the word “women” were to be replaced with the “n-word,” the skit would not have been tolerated.

“This is rich famous Hollywood White male privilege in action,” McGowan wrote. “Replace the word, “women” w/ the ‘N’ word. How does it feel?”

Although the tweet was deleted, Twitter user and #OscarsSoWhite creator April Reign took a screenshot of it and posted it to her Twitter account on Saturday.

McGowan had every right to her indignation. But last I checked, “women” has never held the same derogatory connotation of n**ger, so the unequivocal comparison was simply unwarranted–especially given no Black person took part in the insensitive commentary.

Early on in the conversations that spurred “Me Too,” there was a sense it wasn’t for us. But it doesn’t have to continue on that path. On Monday, Milano credited Burke with the movement on Twitter.

“I think that women of color use social media to make our voices heard with or without the amplification of White women,” Burke said. “I also think that many times when White women want our support, they use an umbrella of ‘women supporting women’ and forget that they didn’t lend the same kind of support.”

The #MeToo founder also said, “In this instance, the celebrities who popularized the hashtag didn’t take a moment to see if there was work already being done, but they also were trying to make a larger point,” she said. “I don’t fault them for that part, I don’t think it was intentional but somehow sisters still managed to get diminished or erased in these situations. A slew of people raised their voices so that that didn’t happen.”

To join Burke’s movement to amplify the voices of sexual assault survivors, go to metoo.support.

(~this article was sourced from: http://www.ebony.com/news-views )

***

The “Growing Up in the #MeToo Movement” (Marie Claire Video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.