The Brujas of the Bronx are a (Girl Power Academy) Skater-Chick featured recommendation…

Brujas from the Bronx Skaters

The Brujas, a crew of female skateboarders, have gathered regularly there for more than two years, but they still tend to turn heads. Even as they have become fixtures in the local skateboarding community, the young women — all of them from ethnic minorities, most from Upper Manhattan or the Bronx — are frequently greeted with catcalling and rubbernecking.

“Silly boys acting like they’ve never seen a girl before,” scoffed Arianna Gil, 22, who helped found the group in 2014. “Skater bros all think they’re rebels, but who are the real outsiders here?”

Skateboarding, which long enjoyed a freewheeling, anti-establishment reputation, has gained substantial mainstream traction and corporate sponsorship over the years. And still the sport remains dominated by men, most of them white. The Brujas hope their presence on the scene will challenge skateboarding culture with what they view as a more radical agenda.

“There’s so little opportunity for young people of color in terms of jobs and education that we don’t feel like a part of this city,” Ms. Gil said. “Skating is a way to reclaim our freedom.”

The Brujas of the Bronx (video documentary) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

A crew of female skaters called The Brujas are trying to redefine skateboarding culture. Produced by: MANJULA VARGHESE

Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/2afLeQK

Brujas is a featured (Girl Power Academy) Music recommendation…

Frasqueri describes herself as having an alter ego collective named “Princess Nokia” In an interview with Bullet Magazine, she explains,

As Princess Nokia I can project the multi-dimensional aspects of myself that I could not express with the name Wavy Spice. I can venture into any realm of music or character of my choosing without confusion. I’m making worldly music—music that will talk to all kinds of people. Banjee girls in Harlem, teen brides in the Middle East, gay boys in East Asia. Labels no longer matter. My new music is cosmic and three-dimensional, and it will really speak of who Princess Nokia is. Princess Nokia is sound. It is progression. It is all that I am.

The Brujas “Princess Nokia” (music video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Directed by Asli Baykal
Co Directed and Concept by Destiny Frasqueri

Production Company: TANK Productions
Line Producer: Ian Lawton King
Assistant Director: Tracy Antonopoulos
Director of Photography: Ben L. Nicholas
1st AC: Ryan Nocella
2nd AC: Govinda Angulo
Production Assistant: Flynn Roddam & Jess Sweat
Sound: Deanna Williams
Editor: Asli Baykal & Adrien Cothier
Additional Editting: Dean Marcial
Colorist: Josh Bohoskey

LYRICS:

I’m your supreme
I’m your supreme

[Verse 1:]
We is them ghetto witches
Speaking in tongue bitches
Fall on the floor
Got sage on the door [x4]

Talk shit, we can cast spells
Long weaves, long nails
Corn rows, pig tails
Baby fathers still in jail

Good witches, I fuck with
Bad bitches, we run shit
4 bitches, 4 corners
North, East, West, South shit

Good witches, I fuck with
Hopped off of my broomstick
Witchcraft, bitch craft
Black magic, it’s nothing

[Chorus:]
Orisha, my alter [x3]
Got coins on the counter

[Verse 2:]
I’m that Black a-Rican bruja straight out from the Yoruba
And my people come from Africa diaspora, Cuba

And you mix that Arawak, that original people
I’m that Black Native American, I vanquish all evil
I’m that Black a-Rican bruja straight out from the Yoruba
And my ancestors Nigerian, my grandmas was brujas

And I come from an island and it’s called Puerto Rico
And it’s one of the smallest but it got the most people

[Chorus:]
Orisha, my alter [x3]
Got coins on the counter
[x2]

Don’t you fuck with my energy [x8]

[Verse 3:]
Casting spells with my cousins
I’m the head of this coven
I’m a shapeshifting bitch, you don’t know who you loving
Better light you a candle
I heard the nighttime was black

And if you don’t watch your step the greatest bitch will be back
I cast a circle in white and I can vanquish your spite
And if you hex me with hate then I’ma conjour the light
Your evil ways put no fight

I ain’t no queen of the night
I’m a bruja, I’m a bruja, and I’ma dress in all white

I’m your supreme [x8]

Tank And The Bangas are (a Girl Power Academy) featured Singer and Band recommendation

Jelly Joseph and Tarriona Tank Ball of Tank and the Bangas (winners of the NPR music Tiny Desk concert award (March 6, 2017)

Check out more videos on the Tank and the Bangas Official Flashsite: http://www.tankandthebangas.com

Band Bio

Originating in New Orleans, Tank and The Bangas have all the qualities that relates them, to the city that birth them but a flair that separates them as well. Their performances range from being “One of the most energetic shows you’ll ever see” to “A gospel tent in Mississippi”. Rummaging through their sound like a thrift store hippie, you’ll find the Bangas to provoke a musical reference of Rhythmic Soul and Spoken word among other genres such as Rock, Gospel, Funk, and Folk. Combining the various musical techniques among the Bangas, coupled with the instilling play on lyrics from the lead vocalist; Tank and The Bangas have quilted a unique sound that singles them as one of the most distinctive groups to come out of New Orleans. The group has graced the cover of one of New Orleans most recognized magazines, “OffBeat” and recently won band of the year at the New Orleans Big Easy Awards. The group has opened for acts such as LiAnne LaHavas, PJ Morton, Galactic, Big Freedia, The Revivalist, and The Soul Rebels. Tank and The Bangas are sure to give you an experience you won’t forget.” 

http://tankandthebangas.wixsite.com/tankandthebangas/biography

 Tank And The Bangas (live concert music video) NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert
Set List:
“Boxes And Squares”
“Quick”
“Rollercoasters”
Musicians:
Tarriona Tank Ball (vocals); Jelly Joseph (vocals); Merell Burkett Jr. (keys); Norman Spence II (keys); Joshua Johnson (drums); Jonathan Johnson (bass); Albert Allenback (saxophone)

Valerie June is a (Girl Power Academy) featured and recommended Musician…

Valerie June

The Order Of Time http://valeriejune.com/biography

“Understanding the order of time is important to anyone hoping to manifest a dream,” says Valerie June. “There is a time to push, and a time to gently tend the garden.”

Since the release of her 2013 breakout Pushin’ Against A Stone, June has been patiently at work in the garden of song, nurturing seedlings with love and care into the lush bloom that is her stunning new album, The Order Of Time. Some songs grew from seeds planted more than a decade ago, others blossomed overnight when she least expected them to, but every track bears the influence of time. See, time has been on June’s mind a lot lately. It’s the only constant in life, even though it’s constantly changing. It’s the healer of all wounds, the killer of all men. It’s at once infinite and finite, ever flowing with twists and turns and brutal, churning rapids that give way to serene stretches of placid tranquility. Fight against the current and it will knock you flat on your ass. Learn to read it, to speak its language, and it will carry you exactly where you’re meant to be.

“Time is the ruler of Earth’s rhythm,” June explains. “Our daily lives revolve around it. Our hearts beat along to its song. If we let it, it can be a powerful guide to turning our greatest hopes and dreams into realities.”

June knows a thing or two about turning hopes and dreams into realities. With Pushin’ Against A Stone, she went from self-releasing her music as Tennessee’s best kept secret to being hailed by the New York Times as one of America’s “most intriguing, fully formed new talents.”  The New Yorker was captivated by her “unique, stunning voice,” while Rolling Stone dubbed her “unstoppable,” and NPR called her “an elemental talent born with the ability to rearrange the clouds themselves.” She astonished TV audiences from coast-to-coast with spellbinding performances on The Tonight ShowThe Late ShowAustin City LimitsRachael Ray, and CBS Saturday Morning, and graced some of the world’s most prestigious stages, from Carnegie Hall to the Kennedy Center. First Lady Michelle Obama invited June to The White House, and she toured with artists like Sharon Jones & The Dap Kings, Sturgill Simpson, Norah Jones, and Jake Bugg in addition to flooring festival crowds at Bonnaroo, Outside Lands, Newport Folk, Hangout, ACL, Pickathon, Mountain Jam and more. In the UK, the reaction was similarly ecstatic. June performed on Later…with Jools Holland, joined a bill with the Rolling Stones in Hyde Park, and took the press by storm. Uncut praised her “remarkably careworn vocals,” MOJO swooned for her “glorious sound,” and The Independent’s Andy Gill wrote, “June has the most strikingly individual delivery I’ve heard in ages.”

When it came time to record the follow-up, June felt liberated by the success, fearless and more confident than ever in trusting her instincts and following her muse. There was to be no rushing the music, no harvesting a song before it was ripe on the vine and ready to be plucked. When she sensed the time was right, she headed to rural Guilford, Vermont, with producer Matt Marinelli, spending long stretches through the fall and winter living and recording away from the hustle and bustle of her adopted home of Brooklyn.

“They made us feel so welcome in Vermont,” remembers June. “I was cooking amazing food and hanging out with the band all the time. There were long talks and long walks in the snow, and friends would come up for holidays. I felt like I put myself in a place where I could really soar. With the last album, I was absorbing and learning and developing so much in the studio, but this is me taking the things I learned and the things I felt in my heart and fighting for them.”

In her heart, June is a songwriter first and foremost, willing and able to blur the lines between genres and eras of sounds. The result is an eclectic blend of folk and soul and country and R&B and blues that is undoubtedly the finest work of her career. Opener “Long Lonely Road” settles in like languid southern heat, as June looks back to the sacrifices of her parents and grandparents, singing in a gentle near-whisper of the sometimes difficult, sometimes beautiful journey we all must undertake in search of brighter days. On the soulful “Love You Once Made,” her voice is backed by rich horns and vintage organ as she makes peace with the specter of loss and the ephemeral nature of our relationships, while the bluesy juke joint rocker “Shake Down” features backup vocals from her brothers, Jason and Patrick Hockett and father, Emerson Hockett recorded at home in Tennessee, and “Man Done Wrong” centers on a hypnotic banjo riff that’s more African than Appalachian.

“People shouldn’t necessarily think of bluegrass when they see the banjo,” explains June. “It was originally an African instrument, and people in America used to play all kinds of banjo: mandolin banjo, ukulele banjo, bass banjo, classical banjo, jazz banjo, there were even banjo orchestras. For some reason people like to limit it and say it just has to be in folk and bluegrass, but to me it can be in anything, and I really wanted to set the banjo free on this record.”

The banjo turns up again later as the underpinning of the R&B rave-up “Got Soul,” which plays out like a mission statement for the entire album, as June offers to “sing a country tune” or “play the blues” but reveals that underneath it all is her sweet soul. Those genre terms might be simplistic ways to attempt to define her, empty signifiers creating distinctions between sounds where June sees none. “With You” channels the sprightly, ethereal beauty of Nico with fingerpicked electric guitar and cinematic strings, “Slip Slide On By” grooves with shades of Van Morrison, and “If And” slowly builds over meditative hum that hints at John Cale.

Despite the music’s varied nature, the songs all belong to a cohesive family, in part because they’re tied together by June’s one-of-a-kind voice, and because they’re all pieces of a larger rumination on the passage of time and how it affects us. The ultimate takeaway from tracks like “The Front Door” and “Just In Time” is that the present is all we have. Everything around us (our loved ones, our youth, our beauty) will someday fade and disappear, but that transience is what makes those things all the more magical. We’re given this brief moment to share our love and light with the world, and when, as June sings on the album, “Time’s hands turn and point straight towards you,” you’d better be ready.

Thankfully for us, June was ready when time told her to harvest these songs. In the garden, as in life, there is a time for everything and the moment has finally arrived to enjoy the fruits of all her labor. With ‘The Order Of Time,’ Valerie June has prepared a bountiful feast, and there’s a seat at the table for everyone.

Valerie June featured on the PBS Newshour

Singer-songwriter Valerie June says inspiration comes to her in all forms, at all times of the day. The Memphis, Tennessee, native reflects on her unique voice. (April 2017)

The Valerie June “Sings and Athem For the Workin’ Woman” is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES. 

The Valerie June “Shakedown” (music video) is being posted here for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

The Valerie June “You Can’t Be Told” (music Video) is being posted her for NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.

Sun Ra is (a Girl Power Academy) featured Jazz Musician

image of Sun Ra

Sun Ra was a highly productive jazz musician, composer, poet and bandleader best known for his “cosmic” philosophies on life and music, and for leading his musical ensemble, the Arkestra.

Famed jazz musician, composer, poet and bandleader Sun Ra was born on May 22, 1914, in Birmingham, Alabama. He began performing professionally as a teen and, after moving to Chicago in 1945, immersed himself in jazz and the blues. Along the way, Sun Ra was influenced by space, religion and radical social movements—all of which found their way into his music. A prolific composer and record label owner, he took to wearing colorful, outlandish costumes with his band members.

Born Herman Poole Blount on May 22, 1914, in Birmingham, Alabama, Sun Ra had an affinity for the piano at a very young age. Ra, who came from a religious family, began performing with other musicians as a teen. In addition to playing with a wide range of musicians from different genres, he wrote and produced songs. After moving to Chicago in 1945, Ra gained important experience working with a growing number of blues and jazz singers, composers and bandleaders, including Wynonie Harris, Fletcher Henderson and Coleman Hawkins.

Chicago also exposed Ra to an African-American intelligentsia and a hotbed of political activism. These religious, cultural and political influences found their way into his music.

In 1952, Ra officially changed his name to Le Sony’r Ra (he also performed under the names Sonny Lee and Le Sonra) while continuing to compose and work with a wide range of jazz practitioners. He also started a record label, Saturn Records, inspired by his love and respect of astronomy as well as the growing influence of spirituality in his life and music. Also in the ’50s, Ra and his band, widely known as the Arkestra (a riff on “orchestra”) began wearing ornate, outlandish costumes in performance—a further manifestation of Ra’s spiritual and theatrical nature.

Performances often included free expression, drum choirs and dancers, and sometimes even acrobats. In The New York Times’ obituary of Ra, writer Peter Watrous noted that the performer’s “willingness to play almost anywhere, from jazz clubs to Egyptian pyramids, from Lower East Side dives with huge 50-member bands, to Coney Island with John Cage, allied him with early performance artists. His career argues persuasively against limitations.”

Ra’s reputation as an Afro-eccentric charlatan-genius in the tradition of Marcus Garvey or Elijah Muhammad led to him becoming one of the 20th century’s greatest avant-garde musician-composers.

But Ra’s skills as an exceptional pianist and composer, always aligned with the swing jazz and blues traditions, never waivered. He also played the organ, harpsichord, celesta and Moog synthesizer. He remained a great innovator, moving to New York in 1961 and to Philadelphia in 1970, and absorbing the spiritual and creative energies of those cities and distilling them into his music. Ra’s extensive discography of studio and live recordings continues to be a reference point for established and up-and-coming jazz musicians and composers.

Sun Ra died in Birmingham on May 30, 1993.

~this music Biography abut Sun Ra was  provided by: http://www.biography.com/people/sun-ra-39870

The Sun Ra “Nuclear War” (music audio) is being posted here FOR NO COMMERCIAL PURPOSES. Special thanks and a shout out to Scott for sharing this last night!!!  

Sun Ra Official Website: http://www.sunraarkestra.com

International Women’s Day is on March 8 and (a Girl Power Academy) is on Board!

In this April 8, 2010 photograph, STS-131 mission specialists Stephanie Wilson of NASA, Naoko Yamazaki of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger of NASA, and Expedition 23 flight engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson (top left) work at the robotics workstation on the International Space Station, in support of transfer operations using the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to move cargo from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module. The STS-131 mission's seven-member crew launched aboard space shuttle Discovery on April 5 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center, joining the six residents of the space station when the shuttle docked on April 7. The merging of the two crews marked the first time four women were in space at the same time. Image Credit: NASA
In this April 8, 2010 photograph, STS-131 mission specialists Stephanie Wilson of NASA, Naoko Yamazaki of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Dorothy Metcalf-Lindenburger of NASA, and Expedition 23 flight engineer Tracy Caldwell Dyson (top left) work at the robotics workstation on the International Space Station, in support of transfer operations using the station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm to move cargo from the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module.
The STS-131 mission’s seven-member crew launched aboard space shuttle Discovery on April 5 from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, joining the six residents of the space station when the shuttle docked on April 7. The merging of the two crews marked the first time four women were in space at the same time.
Image Credit: NASA

https://www.internationalwomensday.com

International Women’s Day resources
Every person – women, men and non-binary people – can play a part in helping drive better outcomes for women. Through meaningful celebration and targeted bold action, we can all be responsive and responsible leaders in creating a more gender inclusive world. The World Economic Forum predicts the gender gap won’t close entirely until 2186. This is too long to wait. So around the world, International Women’s Day provides an important opportunity for ground breaking action that can truly drive greater change for women.

Use International Women’s Day (IWD) on March 8 as an important opportunity to:

celebrate the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women because visibility and awareness help drive positive change for women
declare bold actions you’ll take as an individual or organization to help progress the gender agenda because purposeful action can accelerate gender parity across the world

http://www.un.org/en/events/womensday/

2017 Theme: “Women in the Changing World of Work: Planet 50-50 by 2030”

International Women’s Day is a time to reflect on progress made, to call for change and to celebrate acts of courage and determination by ordinary women who have played an extraordinary role in the history of their countries and communities.

The idea of this theme is to consider how to accelerate the 2030 Agenda, building momentum for the effective implementation of the new Sustainable Development Goals, especially goal number 5: Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls; and number 4: Ensure inclusive and quality education for all and promote lifelong learning. The theme will also focus on new commitments under UN Women’s Step It Up initiative, and other existing commitments on gender equality, women’s empowerment and women’s human rights.

Some key targets of the 2030 Agenda:

By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys complete free, equitable and quality primary and secondary education leading to relevant and Goal-4 effective learning outcomes.
By 2030, ensure that all girls and boys have access to quality early childhood development, care and preprimary education so that they are ready for primary education.
End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere.
Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation.
Eliminate all harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation.
The world of work is changing, and with significant implications for women. On one hand, we have globalization, technological and digital revolution and the opportunities they bring, and on the other hand, the growing informality of labour, unstable livelihoods and incomes, new fiscal and trade policies and environmental impacts—all of which must be addressed in the context of women’s economic empowerment.

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/celebrating-international-womens-day

Amina Mama quote

Michael Archie is (a Girl Power Academy) featured Comic Book Artist recommendation

Michael Archie, Graphic Designer, Illustrator, and the Creator of WorkForce Comics.
Michael Archie, Graphic Designer, Illustrator, and the Creator of WorkForce Comics.

Michael Archie is a Graphic Designer, Illustrator, and the Creator of WorkForce Comics. An Atlanta native, he elected to attend Georgia Southern University where he earned a BFA in Graphic Design. In 2007, Archie began creating freelance artwork under his privately owned art company Perfect Man Designs. Chasing a childhood dream, Archie began developing a comic series in 2012. His dream came to fruition in 2014 when he Self-Published WorkForce Comics: Vol. 1.

You can check out more work by Michael Archie and buy Workforce Comics at:

https://perfectman.wordpress.com

Archie’s influential WorkForce Comics and coveted T-shirts as well as his music inspirations have a devoted audience in Portland, Oregon spanning Mt. Tabor to Goose Hollow, East Burnside to the skirts of Beaverton and Hillsboro.  His comics are making rounds in Vancouver and Seattle, Washington. New Jersey peeps have delivered his good news to Virginia.  New York received him and took him to Ferguson… So, if you ain’t familiar with Mykel yet… NOW is the time to get on board!!!  

a Girl Power Academy is honored to present a few choice works and WorkForce Comic strips with permission from the artist:

"Cosmic Chilln" colored pencil 24x18 2014 illustration by Michael Archie
“Cosmic Chilln” colored pencil 24×18 2014 illustration by Michael Archie
"Critical Beat Down" excerpt from WorkForce Comics Volume 1 by Michael Archie
“Critical Beat Down” excerpt from WorkForce Comic Volume 1 by Michael Archie
"What About Landlines" excerpt from WorkForce Comic Volume 4 by Michael Archie
“What About Landlines” excerpt from WorkForce Comic Volume 4 by Michael Archie

THE INTERVIEW PART 1 (D@MN A SETH ROGAN)
Posted on January 7, 2015

Polite Conversation Interviews Michael Archie about Workforce Comics

THE INTERVIEW PART 2 (D@MN A SETH ROGAN)
Posted on January 9, 2015

Polite Conversation interviews Michael Archie about Workforce Comics (continued)

"Stop Police Terror" Nov. 2010 illustration by Michael Archie "I did this piece as tribute to resistance. Also to pay respects for Derrick Jones, Oscar Grant, Leonard Bradley Jr. and anyone else who has been murdered by the hands of law enforcement." (~M.A.)
“Stop Police Terror” Nov. 2010 illustration by Michael Archie
“I did this piece as tribute to resistance. Also to pay respects for Derrick Jones, Oscar Grant, Leonard Bradley Jr. and anyone else who has been murdered by the hands of law enforcement.” (~M.A.)
"Revolutionary Spirit" colored pencil, 22x18, Jan 2014, by Michael Archie
“Revolutionary Spirit” colored pencil, 22×18, Jan 2014, by Michael Archie

workforce-comic-business-cards-by-michael-archie

Portland fans can buy WorkForce comics at Music Millennium on Burnside.
Portland fans can buy WorkForce comics at Music Millennium on Burnside.
Music Millennium endorses WORKFORCE COMICS by Michael Archie!
a Book Club Logo (sold) by Michael Archie
a Book Club Logo (*sold) by Michael Archie